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AC 30 

1976/77 

Grad 



VERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 




The University of New Haven does not discriminate on the basis of race, 
sex, religion, national origin, or handicap in admissions or treatment of 
students or in recruitment and treatment of employees. 



1976-77 Catalog 
The Graduate School 



O^ 



0^ 
UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



MAIN CAMPUS 

300 ORANGE AVENUE 

WEST HAVEN, CONNECTICUT 06516 

TELEPHONE (203) 934-6321, EXT. 280 OR 207 



This catalog supersedes all previous catalogs and brochures published by 
the Graduate School and describes academic programs to be offered during 
1976-77. Graduate students admitted to the University in the fall of 1976 
and thereafter are bound by the regulations published in this catalog. 

For additional information, write or call 

Office of the Graduate School 

300 Orange Avenue 

West Haven, Connecticut 06516 

Telephone (203) 934-6321, Ext. 280 or 207 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



July 9, 1976 

September 1-2, 1976 
4:30-7:30 p.m. 



Calendar for 

Friday 
Wednesday-Thursday 



September 7, 1976 
September 20, 1976 
September 30, 1976 


Tuesday 
Monday 
Thursday 


November 22-27, 1976 


Monday-Saturday 


December 1, 1976 


Wednesday 


December 1, 1976 


Wednesday 


December 7-13, 1976 
December 15-16, 1976 
4:30-7:30 p.m. 


Tuesday-Monday 
Wednesday-Thursday 


January 3 1977 
January 3, 1977 


Monday 

Monday 


January 14, 1977 
January 23, 1977 


Friday 
Sunday 


February 21, 1977 


Monday 


February 28, 1977 


Monday 


March 11, 1977 


Friday 


March 25, 1977 

4:30-7:30 p.m. 
March 28- April 2, 1977 


Friday 
Monday-Saturday 


April 4, 1977 
April 4, 1977 


Monday 
Monday 


April 8, 1977 


Friday 


April 15, 1977 


Friday 


May 16, 1977 


Monday 


May 30, 1977 


Monday 


June 5, 1977 

June 27- July 2, 1977 

July 11-Sept. 2, 1977 


Sunday 
Monday-Saturday 



1976-1977 

Last day to file Financial Aid Applica- 
tion for Fall trimester 

Registration for new students for the 

Fall trimester 

Fall trimester classes start 

Last day to add a class 

Last day to file Graduation Petition 

for January Commencement 

Thanksgiving Vacation Week 

Last day to file Financial Aid Applica- 
tion for Winter trimester 
Last day to submit application for the 
Winter trimester 
Last week of classes 
Registration for new students for the 
Winter trimester 

Winter trimester classes start 
Last day to submit grades for students 
expecting to graduate in January Com- 
mencement 

Last day to add a class 
Commencement 

Washington's Birthday — Monday 
classes will meet Friday, February 25 
Last day to file Financial Aid Applica- 
tion for Spring trimester 

Last day to submit application for the 

Spring trimester 

Registration for new students for the 

Spring trimester 

Last week of classes 

Spring trimester classes start 

Last day to file Graduation Petition 

for June Comencement 

Good Friday — Friday classes will 

meet Saturday, April 9 

Last day to add a class 

Last day to submit grades for students 
expecting to graduate in June Com- 
mencement 

Memorial Day — Monday classes will 
meet Friday, June 3 

Commencement 

Last week of classes 

Summer Independent Study Session 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Academic Calendar 3 

General Information 7 

Admissions 10 

Academic Standards 12 

Tuition and Fees 13 

Student Services 14 

Programs of Study 
Master of Arts 

Community Psychology IS 

Organizational/Industrial Psychology 21 

Master of Public Administration 24 

Master of Business Administration 26 

Concentrations 28 

Options 30 
Master of Science 

Accounting 33 

Taxation 36 

Computer & Information Science 38 

Industrial Engineering 40 

Operations Research 42 

Criminal Justice 44 

Environmental Sciences 48 

Environmental Engineering 50 

Electrical Engineering 52 

Master of Engineering 54 

Dual Degree Program ( MBA/MSIE ) 57 

Course Descriptions 59 

Faculty 104 

Campus Map 110 

Map of Main Routes to UNH Ill 



ADMINISTRATION 

Phillip S. Kaplan, Ph.D. 
President 

Alexis N. Sommers, Ph.D. 
Provost 

Ned B. Wilson, Ph.D. 
Assistant Provost 

Gwendolyn E. Jensen, Ph.D. 
Dean of the Graduate School 

Henry E. Voegeli, Ph.D. 
Associate Dean 

Virginia D. Klump 
Assistant Registrar 

Geraldine K. Dorman 
Secretary to the Dean 

Marge Manfreda 
Recorder 

Karen Muller 
Admissions Secretary 

Doreen P. Griffith 
Receptionist 



ACCREDITATION 

The University of New Haven is fully accredited as a general purpose 
institution by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. The 
Connecticut Commission for Higher Education authorized the University 
of New Haven to establish a Graduate School and has accredited the de- 
grees of Master of Business Administration, Master of Public Administra- 
tion, Master of Arts, Master of Science, and Master of Engineering. 

Representative memberships in which the University is an active parti- 
cipant include the Council of Graduate Schools, the Association of Inde- 
pendent Colleges, the Assembly of the American Association of Collegiate 
Schools of Business, the College Entrance Examining Board, the American 
Society of Engineering Education, the Educational Testing Service, Ameri- 
can Council on Education, American Association for Higher Education, As- 
sociation of Urban Universities, Council for the Advancement of Small Col- 
leges, and the National Commission on Accrediting. The Engineers' Council 
for Professional Development has accredited the undergraduate mechanical, 
industrial, civil, and electrical engineering programs. 



PROLOGUE 

The Graduate School was established in the Fall, 1969. The first grad- 
uate degrees were awarded in June, 1971, and marked a new phase in the 
University's development. 

A graduate program involves a commitment, or rather a major responsi- 
bility, to provide a graduate faculty and resources capable of providing 
sound instruction and a dynamic learning experience. The University has 
made this commitment. 

Higher education serves both the individual students and the total so- 
ciety. Universities exist as essential components of modern life. Society is 
ever changing as it seeks to solve both old and new problems and to 
create a better life for each of its members. 

The role of the University in meeting the needs of a dynamic society 
is to provide educated men and women trained to meet the manpower 
requirements of such a society. As part of this leadership, the Graduate 
School offers a number of graduate programs at several extension centers 
throughout Connecticut. 

It is the policy of the University to train men and women to lead pro- 
ductive lives and fulfill the needs of the urban environment by offering a 
broad range of flexible programs. In scheduling courses, the Graduate 
School seeks to accommodate both part-time and full-time students. Grad- 
uate courses and certain fields of concentration are also available to 
qualified men and women who wish to update their previous training or 
to acquire new professional skills without pursuing a formal degree ob- 
jective. The Graduate School is therefore open to all. 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The University of New Haven offers graduate programs leading to the 
degrees of 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Community Psychology 
Organizational/Industrial Psychology 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

MASTER OF ENGINEERING 

MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Accounting 

Computer and Information Science 

Criminal Justice 

Electrical Engineering 

Environmental Engineering 

Environmental Sciences 

Industrial Engineering 

Operations Research 

Taxation 

6 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Graduate School operates on a trimester system, offering courses at 
the West Haven campus and at extension centers in Cromwell, Danbury, 
Groton, Middlebury and Waterbury. During an academic year, there are 
three trimesters of 13 weeks each, including the final examination period. 
Classes meet once each week in the late afternoon and evening. A few 
classes are scheduled Saturday mornings. The first trimester begins the sec- 
ond week of September and ends the second week of December; the second 
trimester begins in January and ends the first week of April; the third tri- 
mester begins the second week in April and ends the first week of July. 

Any student who fails to register for three consecutive trimesters will no 
longer receive registration materials. It will be the responsibility of the stud- 
ent to notify Graduate Records that he/she wishes to continue his/her 
graduate studies. 

Current students register by mail, and registrations received after the due 
date will be assessed a late registration fee. Students with an outstanding 
balance will not be permitted to register. 

No registrations or add slips for a course will be accepted after the second 
week of any trimester. A student may withdraw from a course anytime prior 
to the last scheduled class meeting. All course additions or withdrawals must 
be performed in person or by mail. 

Students must complete all the requirements for their degree within 5 
years of the date of the initial matriculation in the program. Any extension 
of the time limit can be granted only by the Dean of the Graduate School 
after consulting with the appropriate program chairman. 

The University reserves the right to change class schedules and instruc- 
tors at any time. It further reserves the right to cancel any course, and in 
such cases, the students will receive a full refund for the course. 



Cancellation of Classes 

In the event that it becomes necessary to cancel graduate classes due to 
inclement weather, radio announcements starting at approximately 1:00 
P.M. will be made on the following radio stations: WADS-690-Ansonia, 
WATR-1320-Waterbury, WWYZ/FM-92.5-Waterbury, WAVZ-1300-New 
Haven, WCDQ-1220-Hamden, WELI-960-New Haven, WFIF-1500-Milford, 
WICC- 600 -Bridgeport, WNAB- 1450 -Bridgeport, WINE- 940 -Brookfield, 
WINE/FM- 95.1 -Brookfield, WKCI/FM- 101.3 -Hamden, WLIS- 1420 -Old 
Saybrook, WNHC-1340-New Haven, WPLR/FM-99.1-New Haven, WPOP- 
1410-Hartford, WQQW-1590- Waterbury, WTIC-1080-Hartford, WTIC/FM- 
96.5-Hartford, WWCO- 1240- Waterbury, WNHU/FM-88.7-West Haven, 
WNLC-1510-New London. 

An announcement of the cancellation of undergraduate day classes does 
not apply to graduate classes unless the announcement states the University 
has been closed. The cancellation of graduate classes will be announced in- 
dependently. 



Transfer Credit and Waiver of Courses 

Credit may be given for graduate courses taken at other accredited in- 
stitutions subject to the following conditions: a) the courses were at the 
graduate level; b) each grade was B or better; and c) the courses did not 
fulfill requirements for any other degree already earned by the student. 
However, a student must complete a minimum of 30 graduate credit hours 
in courses given by the University of New Haven. 

Certain required courses in each program may be waived on the basis 
of undergraduate courses taken at other accredited institutions. For a 
course to be waived, a student must first secure the written approval of the 
Department Chairman or a faculty member acting for the Department 
Chairman in the department in which the waiver is requested. 

Any waiver decision is usually based upon a student's academic record. 
The decision to waive a course is also based upon the assumption that the 
student has a good grasp of the material covered in that course. Therefore, 
a student may subsequently be required to take a course which had been 
waived previously. 

No course that has been waived can be taken for elective credit. 

Requirements for the Thesis & Seminar Project 

Students engaged in independent study for the preparation of a thesis 
or seminar project, select or are assigned, a faculty advisor who acts as the 
student's research advisor until the thesis or seminar project is completed. 
No final examination on the thesis/seminar project is required. 

Two final copies of the thesis/seminar project must be submitted in 
proper form to the Dean of the Graduate School 3 weeks prior to com- 
mencement. The thesis/seminar project is then deposited permanently in 
the University Library. The copies should not be bound. Binding will be 
done by the Library. 

Additional copies of a thesis or seminar project are generally required. 
For this requirement and other regulations regarding the preparation of a 
thesis or seminar project, students should consult the "Manual for the 
Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects." Copies of the manual 
are available in the Graduate School Office. 

Awarding of Degrees 

The University will award degrees twice a year, at commencement in 
January and in June. 

Students completing the requirements for a degree at the end of the fall 
trimester will receive the degree in January; students completing the re- 
quirements for a degree at the end of the winter trimester will receive the 
degree at the June commencement; and students completing the require- 
ments for a degree at the end of the spring trimester will receive the 
degree the following January. Students completing the requirements for a 
degree in July will receive a formal statement that they have completed 
all requirements for the degree and will formally be awarded their diploma 
in January. 



Candidates for January Commencement must file a petition with the 
Graduate School no later than September 30, 1976 and for June Commence- 
ment no later than April 4, 1977. Forms for this purpose are available in the 
Graduate School Office. Upon submission of this petition, the Graduate 
School will review the candidate's record and certify that he/she has met 
the requirements for the degree. A graduation fee of $30 must accompany 
the petition. All financial obligations to the university must be met prior to 
graduation. 

Students completing a thesis/seminar project as part of their degree re- 
quirement must file a petition in the same manner but must also submit 
the final manuscript to their thesis/seminar project advisor prior to the end 
of the tenth week of the trimester in which they expect to complete the 
requirements for their degree. 



Auditor 

An auditor is allowed to attend class and is expected to participate in 
class discussions and complete the required assignments. An auditor receives 
no grade or credit toward any graduate degree. Auditor status does not 
imply admission to any of the graduate degree programs. There is a special 
"Application for Study as an Auditor" form available in the Graduate Office. 
Auditors are charged the same rate of tuition as a regular student. 



Graduate School Ethics 

It is Graduate School policy that each student be expected to complete 
all course requirements on his own initiative and endeavor, with no collab- 
oration unless specifically authorized by an instructor. In addition, material 
used by a student but authored by another individual, publisher, company, 
government, or similar organization shall be identified as such by approp- 
riate footnotes or references. Violations of this policy, either in fact or in 
spirit, will normally be handled by the instructor involved. Students wish- 
ing to appeal the decision of an instructor should contact the Graduate 
School. 



Executive MBA Program 

The University of New Haven offers an Executive Master of Business 
Administration. Presented in conjunction with the Greater New Haven 
Chamber of Commerce, the program is restricted to experienced executives 
and managers willing to devote one afternoon per week while maintaining 
their current full-time job responsibilities. Participants who successfully 
complete the program will be awarded the degree of Executive Master of 
Business Administration. For more information, contact the Director of the 
Executive MBA. 

9 



ADMISSION 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must submit: 

( a ) a formal application; 

( b ) letters of reference; 

(c) complete official transcripts of all previous college work; and 

( d ) an application fee. 

Admission decisions are based primarily on an applicant's undergraduate 
record. A bachelor's degree from an accredited college is required for ad- 
mission. 

In support of their application, students may submit their scores from 
either the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business or the Graduate 
Record Examination (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test). A student may be 
required to take one of these tests. 

Undergraduate courses required to meet graduate prerequisites may not 
count toward meeting the requirements for a graduate degree. 

Students may be admitted at the start of any trimester. Should a student 
be unable to start the trimester for which the acceptance is rendered, the 
admission will be kept open for one calendar year after which time a new 
application will be required. 

Students must register for the first time in person at which time they will 
have an opportunity to review their undergraduate work with a member 
of the faculty and plan a program of study. At this time, a student's pre- 
vious work is reviewed by a member of the faculty who determines what 
course or courses may be waived, if any. This initial meeting provides an 
opportunity for the student to discuss with a faculty member his personal 
goals, academic strengths, and a possible area of concentration. Subse- 
quent registration for each trimester will generally be handled by mail. 

Students may request academic counseling at any time. Appointments 
with members of the graduate staff and faculty should be scheduled 
through department chairmen or program coordinators. 

It is the student's responsibility to select courses in accordance with pre- 
requisites, the advisor's recommendations, the departmental plan of study 
( if required ) , and the requirements for the degree. 

A student is not required to file a formal plan of study with the Grad- 
uate School. It is the student's responsibility to meet the stated require- 
ments for the degree. This policy is consistent with the University's tradi- 
tion of offering a flexible curriculum to meet the particular needs of an 
individual. 

10 



On occasion, a student who has not had an undergraduate program of 
study which would qualify the student for admission to the requested gradu- 
ate program may be required to take undergraduate courses or a combina- 
tion of undergraduate and graduate courses in order to qualify for admis- 
sion to the Graduate School. 

Special Student Status is reserved for students who do not wish to 
matriculate in a program. Registration is limited to 12 credit hours of 
graduate work. Should the student desire to attempt further graduate work, 
the student must be accepted into a specific graduate program. Special Stu- 
dent Status does not imply that a student will be automatically accepted into 
a program. 



FOREIGN STUDENT ADMISSIONS 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must submit: 

( a ) formal application; 

(b) three letters of reference; 

(c) complete official transcripts of all previous college work; 

(d) an application fee of $15; 

(e) A TOEFL Score; and 

(f) complete Certification of Financial Responsibility forms. 

Foreign students must submit their score on the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL). A student who scores less than 550, if ac- 
cepted, will be required to take special work in English. These students 
will be required to satisfactorily complete E600 — The Uses of Language 
which is offered each trimester by the Graduate School. 

Upon acceptance students are invited to contact the Director of Housing 
for assistance in locating living accommodations. 

University resources do not permit the awarding of financial assistance to 
foreign students. Estimated costs during the 1976-77 Academic Year for 
students with no dependents are: 

Based on 9 Credits — Per Trimester Trimester Academic Year 

Base Living Costs $1,100.00 

Tuition & Fees 606.00 

Books (Approximate) 80.00 

Total $1,786.00 $5,358.00 

Graduate students studying under an F-l visa are allowed 24 months to 
complete a degree program. All F-l visa students must register for a mini- 
mum of 9 credit hours each trimester. Once visa students have completed 
their degree program, the Foreign Student Office will not issue an 1-538 
for extension of temporary stay, except for periods of practical training ap- 
proved by the Graduate School. 

11 



ACADEMIC STANDARDS 

A student must maintain a 3.0 quality point ratio ( QPR ) for graduation. 

The Graduate School has the following grading system: A — superior per- 
formance, B — good performance, C — passing performance, and F — failure. 
The quality points by grade are: A=4, B=3, C=2, and Fr=0. A grade of 
F carries no graduate credit and must be repeated. Other grades are 
P=Pass, though no quality points are earned, the course carries credit 
hours toward the degree, and S=Satisfactory is used to denote satisfactory 
performance and U=Unsatisfactory performance in a non-credit course. A 
grade of W is used when a student withdraws from a course. A student may 
withdraw from a course at any time, prior to the final examination. 

On rare occasions, a student may receive a grade of Inc. ( incomplete ) . It 
is the responsibility of the student to complete the course as soon as pos- 
sible. An incomplete grade that is not changed within one calendar year 
will automatically revert to a W. 

A grade of T is only used for thesis/seminar project students who have 
not finished their thesis during the trimester for which they originally regis- 
tered for the course. Students must complete their thesis within the maxi- 
mum allowable time for graduate work. 

A student may repeat a course, with the new grade superseding the old 
grade in the computation of the quality point ratio. However, the original 
grade remains on the transcript. 

PROBATION POLICY 

Any graduate student whose cumulative quality point ratio ( QPR ) is be- 
low 3.0 (B average) will be considered to be on academic probation and 
required to obtain permission from his/her program coordinator before 
registering for additional course work. A student whose QPR is below 2.7 
after completion of twenty-four credits will be dismissed from the Graduate 
School. 



12 



TUITION AND FEES 

Non-refundable fees: 

application fee $15.00 

registration fee, per trimester 5.00 
Graduate Student Council fee, per trimester 1.00 

auditor application fee 5.00 

late registration fee — current students 10.00 

graduation fee 30.00 

transcript — first copy free 1.00 

Other fees: 

tuition per credit hour 65.00 

auditor, per credit hour 65.00 

computer use fee 10.00 

non-credit course, each course 125.00 

Tuition for graduate courses is due at registration. However the Univer- 
sity permits graduate students to pay their tuition on an installment basis, 
remitting one-half with the registration form and the balance within thirty 
days. Master Charge and BankAmericard are accepted by the University for 
tuition. 

Students are responsible for the payment of tuition to the University 
even though some companies will reimburse employees for tuition. It is 
the responsibility of students to arrange with their employer for reimburse- 
ment. 

Grades, transcripts, and registration materials will not be issued to a 
student whose financial account is delinquent. 

To be eligible for a refund, a student must formally notify the Graduate 
Office of his/her intention to withdraw and complete the withdrawal form 
either by mail or in person. The date on which the drop slip is submitted 
to the Graduate School Office (if in person) or the date of the postmark 
(if by mail) determines the amount of refund, if any, due the student. 

The refund policy for graduate students who withdraw from any course 
or from any program is as follows: 100% refund of tuition upon formal with- 
drawal prior to tiie second regularly scheduled class meeting, 75% refund 
of tuition upon formal withdrawal prior to the third regularly scheduled 
class meeting, 50% refund of tuition upon formal withdrawal prior to the 
fourth regularly scheduled class meeting, 25% refund of tuition upon formal 
withdrawal prior to the fifth regularly scheduled class meeting. No refund 
will be made after the fifth regularly scheduled class meeting. 



13 



STUDENT SERVICES 

Athletics 

Graduate students are encouraged to make use of the North Campus 
Athletic Complex. Facilities include three basketball courts, handball- 
paddleball court, weight room with universal gym, a multi-purpose exercise 
room, steam room, fully equipped training room, six tennis courts, two soft- 
ball fields, baseball diamond and combination football-soccer-lacrosse field. 

While graduate students are not eligible to participate in the undergradu- 
ate intercollegiate athletic program, they are eligible to take an active part 
in the vast intramural sports program administered by Physical Education 
Department Chairman, Don Wynschenk. Intramural competition in touch 
football, badminton, bowling, three and five player basketball, paddleball, 
softball, tennis, floor hockey and volleyball are sponsored. 

A validated UNH ID card is required for entrance to the North Campus 
gym or tennis courts, during non-class or free time hours. In general, the 
gymnasium is open for graduate student use at times when regularly 
scheduled games and classes are not in progress. Students should take care 
to secure their locker or leave properly identified valuables with the equip- 
ment manager while using any facility. 

Students who participate in intramurals or use any UNH athletic com- 
plex facility, are not covered by the University athletic insurance policy 
and participate at their own risk. The University recommends that an ap- 
propriate insurance policy be carried by each student to cover medical 
costs in case of injury. 

During the school year, the gymnasium is open from 9:00 a.m. to 9:30 
p.m. Monday thru Friday with the hours 5:00 p.m. thru 9:30 p.m. generally 
reserved for undergraduate and graduate student use. The gym is available 
from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday. The building is closed Sundays. 
On Monday evening the main gymnasium is reserved for volleyball. 

The tennis courts are open dawn to dusk during clement weather and 
are supervised during peak hours, limiting use to UNH students and per- 
sonnel on a one hour time limit basis. 

The paddleball court must be reserved a day in advance by calling 
934-6320 prior to 8:30 a.m. and 934-6321, Ext. 255 between 8:30 a.m. and 
5:00 p.m. 

It is hoped that graduate students will avail themselves of a full range 
of activities and that they will seek out Athletic Department and Physical 
Education Department staff members to express interests in areas where 
further graduate student participation can be encouraged. 

Library 

The new Marvin K. Peterson Library, named for President Emeritus 
Peterson, was dedicated October 20, 1974. Built at a cost of $1,664,280, the 
new library has a capacity of 300,000 bound volumes. It adjoins the main 
administration building and includes a rare book room, a special collection 
room, a music room, archives and spacious reading and reference areas. 
Study is made convenient by modern research facilities and equipment, 
including eight microreading stations and three microform reader-printers. 

14 



The Library contains more than 90,000 volumes, 50,000 U.S. documents, 
over 6,500 LP's, extensive corporation annual reports, pamphlet files, and 
microfilm. The Library subscribes to 975 periodicals and extensive back- 
issue files are maintained. 

In order to check out books from the library, a student must have a 
validated identification card which is issued at registration. 

Computer Center 

A modern, well equipped computer center is maintained to serve the 
academic and administrative needs of the University. The computer center 
acquired a new Meta-4 system produced by Digital Scientific of California. 
This system includes 6 disk drives ( 20 million characters per pack ) , 2 mag 
tape drives, two 600 cpm card readers, two 600 1pm printers, 1 card punch, 
a graph plotter, remote terminals and other peripheral equipment. The 
Meta-4 system permits use of all major business and technical programming 
languages. 

The University also owns a Burroughs System 300 computer donated by 
the First New Haven National Bank. The computer center and key punch 
area are available to students during extended hours on weekdays and 
Saturdays. 

Foreign Students 

The Graduate School accepts foreign students from a number of different 
countries. The Foreign Student Advisor offers special guidance and assist- 
ance when needed. The International Students Club on campus sponsors 
activities and trips. The International Student Center of New Haven (near 
the Yale campus ) invites all foreign students to use their facilities and pro- 
grams throughout the year. 

Veterans Affairs 

Since the University has one of the largest veteran enrollments in Con- 
necticut, an Office of Veterans Affairs, with a full-time Coordinator and 
secretary, is maintained. The Veterans Administration has assigned to the 
University a full-time V.A. representative who maintains liaison directly 
with state and national V.A. offices. In addition to processing applications 
for various V.A. benefits, the campus Veterans office provides a wide range 
of supportive services for veterans attending the University. Assistance is 
available in academic areas and special help such as tutorial assistance is 
available. 

Women's Affairs 

The Office of the Director of Women's Affairs is located in the Main 
Building. Activities of special interest to women are coordinated through 
the Director, who meets regularly with women students. Personal counsel- 
ing is available at any time. 

Women's Studies programs are developed by a group of faculty, staff 
and students dedicated to the promotion of women's issues at the University. 

15 



Career Development Office 

This office has two primary functions within the University: career 
counseling and placement. The staff works closely with the Counseling 
Center to help determine an appropriate career path for individual students. 
To assist students in a career choice, individual counseling, a career library 
and career seminars are available. In addition, a program of on-campus re- 
cruiting visits by employers is arranged each year for the benefit of Uni- 
versity of New Haven students, both undergraduate and graduate. 

While the Career Development Office is not an employment service, 
listings of full-time and part-time openings are maintained to provide a 
common meeting ground for employers and prospective employees. 

Students seeking employment should visit the office personally as early 
as possible to discuss their plans. Alumni seeking positions are invited to 
use the services of the office. 

Employers wishing to list positions with the Career Development Office 
need only call the office or write, giving a description of the position avail- 
able and other details. There is never any fee charged for listing a position. 

Graduate Student Council 

The Graduate Student Council is a forum where graduate students can 
provide a viable input to the administration in order to improve all 
aspects of graduate education at the University. The Council schedules a 
number of extracurricular activities and all graduate students are en- 
couraged to attend. 

Radio Station 

WNHU, 88.7 MHZ, is the University's student-operated FM radio station. 
The 1,700 watt station serves a potential listening audience of over 2,000,000 
people in Connecticut and Long Island. 

WNHU is an extra-curricular activity, funded by the Day Student Gov- 
ernment, and staffed by students from all sections of the University com- 
munity. 

The Student Center 

The Student Center provides a focal point for all student activities. Offer- 
ing lounges, student offices, a game room, a large cafeteria and a snack bar, 
the facility has been designed to serve as a center for the student's non- 
academic college interests. 

The Rathskellar, also located in the Student Center, opens daily, serving 
draft beer and snacks. 

Bookstore 

The University bookstore offers new and used text materials, art and 
engineering supplies, and a large variety of University emblemed gift items. 

Financial Aid 

Financial aid is available to graduate students in the form of scholar- 
ships, grants, loans, bursary work, work-study programs, teaching assistant- 
ships, and research assistantships. 

16 



The University provides full tuition scholarships to outstanding candi- 
dates, based upon academic achievement, financial need, and potential 
contribution in the field of study. Partial tuition grants are also available 
for those students needing help to pursue their degree on a part-time basis. 

Part-time employment is available as departmental assistants within the 
University. Selected students may work a maximum of twenty hours a 
week, with the work schedule and maximum earnings determined by the 
requirements of the department involved. 

The College Work-Study Program is designed to enable students with 
financial need to work on-campus and off-campus with several non-profit 
community organizations. Typically, such jobs average fifteen hours a week. 

Interested students should apply at the Financial Aid Office. 

Opportunities are available for academically qualified graduate students 
to teach undergraduate courses. Selection is made by the appropriate de- 
partment and compensation is at the prevailing rate for adjunct faculty. 

The State of Connecticut and other states have established loan programs 
offering long term loans at low interest rates. In Connecticut, a student may 
borrow up to a maximum of $2500 each school year. Repayment starts one 
year after graduation. If the family's income (adjusted) is under $15,000 
annually, federal interest benefits cover the full interest while in attendance 
and during the grace period. 

Foreign students are not normally eligible for financial assistance as they 
must certify availability of sufficient funds at time of entry. 

All financial aid applications must be submitted four weeks prior to the 
beginning of the trimester for which the student is seeking financial aid 
and must be accompanied by a copy of the student's most recent Federal 
Tax return, Form 1040. GAPSFAS ( Graduate and Professional School Fi- 
nancial Aid Service) applications are accepted for aid consideration. 

A student on academic probation is not eligible for financial aid. 

The Law Enforcement Assistance Programs (LEEP) 

Loans. The Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 es- 
tablished the Law Enforcement Student Loan Program which makes avail- 
able ten year, interest bearing (7%) notes of up to $2,200 per academic 
year to full-time students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs 
leading to degrees in areas directly related to law enforcement. These loans 
can be cancelled at the rate of 25% for each year of employment in a public, 
state, local, or federal law enforcement agency. 

Grants. Grants are available to full-time employees of a publicly funded 
law enforcement agency under the Law Enforcement Student Grant Pro- 
gram. Payments up to $250 per trimester are provided to full-time or part- 
time students working toward a degree in this field. A recipient must agree 
to remain with a law enforcement agency for two years after completion 
of studies funded by this grant. 

Awards under the LEEP Program are subject to current guidelines of 
the Department of Justice and the availability of funds. 

Full information and applications for financial aid can be obtained from 
the Financial Aid Office. 

17 



MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY 

The general purpose of the Master of Arts program in Community Psy- 
chology is to provide training at the graduate level for careers in human 
services delivery systems utilized in community mental health centers and 
community action programs. Specifically, the program strives to : 

1. develop and enlarge the student's appreciation of the complexities, 
interrelationships and problems that characterize the community; 

2. prepare students to utilize psychological backgrounds to solve con- 
temporary community problems; 

3. foster development of problem-solving strategies which enhance men- 
tal health, educational and personality development; and 

4. train students in performance characteristics as members of research 
teams, therapeutic teams, and public information teams working under 
professional guidance. 

A collateral objective is to provide graduate training in the late afternoon 
and early evening for the convenience of men and women who are employed 
on a full-time basis. 



Admission Policy 

Applicants are expected to possess social and interpersonal characteristics 
which will support success in human service occupations. 

Students who give evidence of sustained interest in community and human 
service and who hold an undergraduate degree from an accredited college 
or university are eligible for admission. 

Applicants are required to complete a questionnaire to be submitted 
directly to the Graduate School and may be required to submit scores from 
either the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record Examination 
Aptitude Test. An undergraduate major in psychology is not specifically 
required as a basis for consideration. However, all students are expected to 
have at least an introductory level understanding of psychological concepts, 
principles, and methods before taking courses in the Master of Arts in Com- 
munity Psychology program. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in Community Psychology 

A total of 39 credit hours is required for the Master of Arts in Community 
Psychology degree. Candidates for this degree will be required to complete 
21 credit hours of core curriculum courses, including three trimesters of field 
experience and practicum. 

Eighteen of the 39 credit hours are electives chosen after consultation 
with a departmental advisor to help pursue individual academic and pro- 
fessional goals. The organization of the Master of Arts in Community Psy- 
chology program is such that elective courses constitute a very small part 
of the first year's work but become the major constituents of the second year. 

18 



Each candidate must complete a minimum of thirty credit hours in resi- 
dence at the University of New Haven. 

Though academic credit may be accepted as the basis for a course waiver, 
i.e. graduate transfer credit, field experience may not be used as the basis for 
a course waiver. 

Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for P 698 Thesis I and 
P 699 Thesis II. The thesis must show ability to organize materials in a clear 
and original manner and present well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in charge 
of the thesis seminar or a faculty member with special competence in the 
subject matter of the thesis. The complete and final manuscript must be 
submitted to the thesis advisor prior to the end of the tenth week of the tri- 
mester in which the candidate expects to complete the requirements for his 
degree. The final approved copies of the thesis must also be submitted to 
the Dean of the Graduate School 3 weeks prior to commencement. No final 
examination on the thesis is required. 

Two copies of the thesis are deposited permanently in the Library 7 . Addi- 
tional copies of the thesis are usually required. For this requirement and 
other regulations regarding the preparation of a thesis, students should con- 
sult the "Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar Pro- 
jects." Copies of the manual are available in the Graduate School Office. 

Field Experience & Practicum Seminar 

The field-study courses will be integrated with the instructional courses 
of the program. While the field-study courses are shaped by the agency pro- 
gram in which they occur, the student simultaneously carries on a rich pro- 
gram of reading. For each field-study trimester, the student will be required 
to prepare a plan of experience under the guidance of his advisor. At the 
end of each trimester the student will submit a report on his experience, skill 
development, and insights. 

A salient characteristic of the Field Experience & Practicum Seminar se- 
quence involves the role of the field experience coordinator who works with 
the student both at the site of the field experience and in the practicum 

seminar. 



19 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 
THE MASTER OF ARTS IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

P 605 Survey of Community Psychology 3 

P 607 Special Problems in Community Psychology 3 

P 609 Research Methods 3 

P 611 Field Experience & Practicum Seminar I: 

The Dyadic Relationship 3 

P 612 Field Experience & Practicum Seminar II: 

Models of Consultation 3 

P 61 3 Field Experience & Practicum Seminar III: 

Systems Intervention 3 

P 680 Community Mental Health Philosophy & Concepts 3 

Electives* 18 

39 

"To be selected after consultation with a departmental advisor. 



20 



MASTER OF ARTS IN 
ORGANIZATIONAL/INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The Master of Arts Program in Organizational/Industrial Psychology is 
designed as an interdisciplinary program leading to the development of ex- 
pertise in the application of Psychology for men and women involved in 
supervisory roles and for those planning such professional careers. The pro- 
gram emphasizes both the principles and procedures of psychology and the 
perspectives of other disciplines in preparing the student to meet organiza- 
tional problems in their full complexity. Approximately two dozen top in- 
dustrialists have agreed to assist the department in the continuing develop- 
ment of the problem. 

The program further strives to: 

1. familiarize the student with contemporary research and publications 
concerned with mutual relationships between organizational charac- 
teristics and the employee's behavior; 

2. provide the student with an improved understanding of psychological 
findings relating to personnel counseling, test administration and in- 
terpretation for selection, transfer, and promotion as well as manage- 
ment development; 

3. enhance the student's knowledge of current psychological information 
and skills relating to human-need satisfaction, executive training, or- 
ganizational climate, problem solving and decision making, effective 
organizational change, and the study of organizationally-induced stress; 

4. familiarize the student with current psychological theory and findings 
relating to attitude measurement, personnel policy evaluation and de- 
veloDment. and management development programs; 

5. meet the increasing needs of organizations for individuals with spe- 
cialized research and human relations skills; and 

6. provide graduate study on a late afternoon and early evening basis 
for the full-time employee. 

Admission Policy 

Applicants are expected to possess social and interpersonal characteristics 
which will support success in organizational settings. 

Students who give evidence of a mature interest in the application of psy- 
chological principles to organizational problems and who hold an under- 
graduate degree from an accredited college or university are eligible for 
admission. 

Applicants are required to complete a questionnaire and submit it directly 
to the Graduate School and may be required to submit scores from either 
the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude 
Test. An undergraduate major in psychology is not specifically required as 
a basis for consideration. However, all students are expected to have at least 
an introductory level understanding of psychological concepts, principles, 
and methods before taking courses in the Master of Arts in Organizational/ 
Industrial Psychology program. 

21 



Requirements for the Master of Arts in Organizational/Industrial 
Psychology Degree 

A total of 39 credit hours is required of candidates for the degree of 
Master of Arts in Organizational/Industrial Psychology. Candidates for this 
degree will be required to complete IS credit hours of required courses in 
the core curriculum. Another 21 credit hours of electives will be chosen after 
consultation with the department chairman or his representative in light 
of the student's academic and professional goals. The student may not com- 
plete more than 9 credit hours of electives until he/she has satisfied the 
core requirements. Up to 9 credit hours of electives may be taken in other 
departments, such as Industrial Engineering, Economics, Management, 
Marketing, Public Administration or Criminal Justice. 

Academic credit may be given for graduate courses taken at other ac- 
credited institutions. However, each candidate must complete a minimum 
of 30 credit hours in residence at the University of New Haven in order 
to qualify for the degree. 



Program Options 

In response to the different needs and levels of preparation of students in 
the program, the four following options are available: 

Option 1 is recommended for an individual currently employed in a 
managerial or supervisory position. The practicum seminars will allow 
the student to investigate a specific job-related problem under expert 
faculty supervision. 

Option 2 affords the student with limited work experience an opportu- 
nity to serve an industrial internship, providing the student the chance to 
observe real organizational/industrial situations to be analyzed and dis- 
cussed with a faculty supervisor. 

Option 3 will provide the student planning to pursue doctoral studies 
with an essential tool — the ability to do empirical research and report 
writing through the preparation of a Thesis. 

Option 4 consists of elective courses selected under faculty advisement. 
The choice of electives is intended to provide the student with a broad 
interdisciplinary background, complementing the student's own academic 
training and interests. 

Normally the student should not begin work on any of the first three op- 
tions until he/she has completed at least four more core courses. 

22 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR THE MASTER OF ARTS IN 
ORGANIZATIONAL/INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

P 606 Seminar in Organizational/Industrial Psychology 3 

P 609 Research Methods 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

P 635 Assessment of Human Performance with 

Standardized Tests 3 

P 640 Industrial Motivation & Morale 3 

Electives* 21 

39 



Elective Options 
Option 1 

P 691 Practicum 1 3 

P 692 Practicum II 3 

Electives* 15 



Option 2 



P 693 Organizational Internship I 3 

P 694 Organizational Internship II 3 

Electives* 15 



Option 3 



P 698 Thesis I 3 

P 699 Thesis II 3 

Electives* 15 



Option 4 



Electives* 21 



*The choice of electives is made in consultation with a departmental 
graduate advisor in light of the student's academic and professional goals. 



23 



MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

The general purpose of the Master of Public Administration degree at 
the University of New Haven is the training of men and women at the 
graduate level for public service careers. Specifically, the program strives to: 

1. equip students with the modern analytical and quantitative tools of 
decision-making and their application to the complex problems of 
government; 

2. expose the students to the wide range of administrative and manage- 
rial problems and responsibilities of government; and 

3. increase the student's knowledge and skills in the particular manage- 
ment functions of budgeting, planning, public policy formulation, 
public finance, and public personnel administration. 



Requirements for the Master of Public Administration Degree 

A maximum of 45 credit hours is required of candidates for this degree. 

A maximum of 9 credit hours of required courses in the MPA pro- 
gram may be waived on the basis of undergraduate courses and/or ap- 
propriate work experience. For a course to be waived, a student must 
first secure the written approval of the department chairman or a faculty 
member acting for the chairman of the public administration department. 

Each candidate must complete a minimum of 30 graduate credit hours 
in residence at the University of New Haven in order to qualify for the 
Master of Public Administration degree. 

Undergraduate courses may not be counted in meeting the minimum 36 
credits required for the Master of Public Administration degree. 

Students in this program should be familiar with the use of computers. 
The use of a computer is required in a number of courses in the program. 
Students deficient in this area should register for IE 603C, Introduction to 
Digital Computers: COBOL or IE 603F, Introduction to Digital Computers: 
FORTRAN, as an elective early in their program of study. However, a 
student will only be granted graduate credit for either IE 603C or IE 603F, 
not both. 

Of the 15 credit hours of electives in the MPA program, 6 credit hours 
may be taken in graduate courses offered in other programs such as Psy- 
chology, Criminal Justice, Economics, and Industrial Engineering. 

24 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 
THE MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

PA 601 Principles of Public Administration 3 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and 

Implementation 3 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

PA 611 Research Methods in Public 

Administration 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public 

Sector 3 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 3 

PA 604 Seminar in Communities and Social 

Change 3 

PA 690 Research Project 3 

PA 693 Public Administration Internship 3 

Electives 15 

45 



25 



MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The general purpose of the MBA program at the University of New 
Haven is the education of men and women at the graduate level for careers 
in business administration as well as other job areas requiring a sound 
grasp of business principles. The overall objective of the program is to en- 
hance the student's perspective of managerial skills. The program has been 
designed to develop a professional point of view in managing an organiza- 
tion. It further develops the student's ability to utilize the newest analytical 
and quantitative techniques used in corporate decision making. The student 
is also exposed to an in depth analysis of various theories of business and 
managerial behavior, emphasizing the business organization in relation to 
its internal and external environment. Another important objective of the 
program is to afford the student an opportunity to develop special skills 
by concentrating in a given study area. 

Requirements for the MBA Degree 

A maximum of 45 credit hours with a thesis is required of candidates 
for the MBA degree. If maximum waiver credit is granted, a student must 
complete a minimum of 30 credit hours for the MBA degree. The residence 
requirement is also 30 graduate credit hours. Undergraduate courses may 
not be counted in meeting the minimum 30 credits required for the MBA 
degree. 

Candidates for the MBA degree are urged to write a thesis as part of the 
requirement for the degree. A thesis student has the opportunity to work 
with a faculty member on a mutually determined research project. Candi- 
dates who elect not to write a thesis must take two additional business 
courses in place of Thesis. 

Students in the MBA program should be familiar with the use of com- 
puters in solving problems. The use of a computer is required in a number 
of courses in the MBA program. Students deficient in this area should regis- 
ter for IE 603C Introduction to Digital Computers: COBOL. Students wish- 
ing to learn FORTRAN should register for IE 603F. However, a student 
will only be granted graduate credit for either IE 603C or IE 603F, not both. 

A student must complete the basic core before taking advanced courses 
in the MBA program. The basic core consists of EC 603, EC 604, QA 604, 
and QA 605. 

Waiver Policy 

Required courses in the MBA program may be waived on the basis of 
undergraduate courses taken at accredited institutions. For a course to be 
waived, a student must first secure the written approval of the department 
chairman or a faculty member acting for the chairman of the department 
in which the course if offered. 

A course that has been waived cannot be taken for elective credit. 

26 



Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for thesis in the ap- 
propriate business department. The thesis must show ability to organize 
material in a clear and original manner and present well-reasoned con- 
clusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in charge 
of the departmental thesis program or a faculty member with special com- 
petence in the subject matter covered by the thesis. The complete and final 
manuscript must be submitted to the thesis advisor prior to the end of the 
tenth week of the trimester in which the student expects to complete the 
requirements for his degree. The two final approved copies must also be sub- 
mitted to the Dean of the Graduate School 3 weeks prior to Commencement. 
No final examination on the thesis is required. 

The thesis is deposited permanently in the Library. Students are required 
to submit two copies of the thesis for the Library. Additional copies of the 
thesis are usually required. For this requirement and other regulations re- 
garding the preparation of a thesis, students should consult the "Manual 
for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects." Copies of 
the manual are available in the Graduate School Office. 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 
THE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

Microeconomic Analysis 3 

Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

Probability and Statistics 3 

Advanced Statistics 3 

Marketing 3 

Finance 3 

Management 3 

Organizational Behavior 3 

Managerial Accounting 3 

Industrial Relations 3 

Thesis* 3 

Electives 12 

45 

^Candidates who elect not to write a thesis must take two additional busi- 
ness courses in place of Thesis. 



EC 


603 


EC 


604 


QA 


604 


QA 


605 


MK 


609 


FI 


615 


MG 637 


P 


619 


A 


621 


EC 


625 



27 



MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATIONS 

Within the Master of Business Administration Program, the student is al- 
lowed to concentrate in a specific study area. There are several structured 
concentrations offered by various departments. A concentration consists of 
four courses taken in one area. 

Accounting 

A 630 Advanced Corporate Tax Planning I 

A 631 Advanced Corporate Tax Planning II 

A 640 Advanced Problems in Budgeting 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 

Computer and Information Science 

IE 603 Introduction to Digital Computers 

IE 605 Common Programming Languages I, or 

IE 606 Computer Programming Languages II 

IE 610 Computer Systems Design 

IE 614 Data Information Systems 



Finance 

FI 651 Portfolio Management and Capital Market Analysis 

FI 645 Corporate Financial Theory 

FI 617 Financial Institutions and Capital Markets 

FI 649 Security Analysis, or 

FI 655 Commodity Market Analysis, or 

FI 661 Real Estate: Principles and Practices, or 

FI 619 Monetary and Central Banking Policy 



Hotel Management 

HM 610 Seminar in Hotel Management Theory 

HM 620 Financial Management 

HM 630 Personnel Relations Management or 

HM 640 Executive Cuisine Development or 

HM 690 Research Projecl 



International Business 

IB 643 International Business Operations, or 

MG 660 Comparative Management, or 

IB 651 Comparative Marketing, or 

IB 652 Multinational Business Operations, or 

IB 644 Import and Export Business, or 

EC 641 International Economics 



28 



Management and Organization 

MG 662 Organization Theory 

MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 

MG 669 Business Policy and Strategy 

MG 663 Leadership in Organizations, or 

MG 661 Development of Management Thought, or 

MG 660 Comparative Management 



Marketing 

MK 639 Marketing Research 
MK 641 Marketing Management 
MK 643 Product Management 

One other course in Marketing 



Operations Research 

IE 607 Probability Theory 

IE 621 Linear Programming 

IE 622 Queuing Theory 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 



Economic Forecasting 

Forecasting 

Econometrics 

Introduction to Digital Computers : FORTRAN 

Managerial Economics, or 

Advanced Technical Programming, or 

Urban & Regional Economic Development, or 

Research Project, or 

Marketing Research & Information Systems 



Management Science 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/Management Science 

IE 604 Management Systems 

QA 606 Advanced Management Science 

QA 607 Forecasting 



QA 


607 


EC 


653 


IE 


603F 


MG 633 


IE 


606 


EC 


665 


EC 


690 


MK 


639 



29 



MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM OPTIONS 

There are two graduate business programs that require extensive under- 
graduate training. They are accounting and hotel management. The Master 
of Business Administration degree program with the appropriate option 
allows the graduate student to complete the required undergraduate core 
in either discipline while satisfying the requirements for the MBA. For 
example, a student selecting the MBA with Hotel Management Option 
will be required to take a maximum of 36 graduate credit hours or a 
minimum of 30 graduate credit hours. Anyone who holds an undergraduate 
degree in Hotel Management may not take this program. In addition, the 
student must also complete 30-36 credit hours of undergraduate Hotel 
Management courses. Similarly, the MBA with Accounting Option calls for 
a maximum of 36 graduate credit hours or a minimum of 30 graduate 
credit hours in addition to 30-36 hours of undergraduate accounting from 
either the financial accounting concentration or the managerial accounting 
concentration. Anyone who holds an undergraduate degree in Accounting 
may not take this program. 



Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for thesis in the appropri- 
ate business department. The thesis must show ability to organize material 
in a clear and original manner and present well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in charge 
of the departmental thesis program or a faculty member with special com- 
petence in the subject matter covered by the thesis. The complete and final 
manuscript must be submitted to the thesis advisor prior to the end of the 
tenth week of the trimester in which the student expects to complete the 
requirements for his degree. The two final approved copies must also be 
submitted to the Dean of the Graduate School 3 weeks prior to Com- 
mencement. No final examination on the thesis is required. 

The thesis is deposited permanently in the Library. Students are required 
to submit two copies of the thesis for the Library. Additional copies of the 
thesis are usually required. For this requirement and other regulations re- 
garding the preparation of a thesis, students should consult the "Manual 
for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects." Copies of 
the manual are available in the Graduate School Office. 



30 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 

THE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

WITH HOTEL MANAGEMENT OPTION 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

MK 609 Marketing 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

HM 698 Thesis* 3 

Electives 6 

36 

* Candidates who elect not to write a thesis must take two additional busi- 
ness courses in place of Thesis. 

Required Undergraduate Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

HM 101 Laws of Inn-Keeping 3 

HM 103 Principles of Hotel Management 3 

HM 150 Management Decision Making 3 

HM 165 Tourism 3 

HM 201 Front Office Administration 3 

HM 302 Purchasing & Control 3 

HM 321 Principles of Hotel and Restaurant Administration 3 

HM 322 Mkts. & Promotion of Public Services 3 

HM 325 Food & Beverage Control 3 

HM 410 Hotel Systems & Operations 3 

HM 411 Equip. Layout & Design 3 

HM 512 Seminar 3 

36 



31 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 

THE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

WITH ACCOUNTING OPTION 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

QA 604 Probability & Statistics 3 

QA 605 Advanced Statistics 3 

MK 609 Marketing 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

A 698 Thesis 3 

Electives** 6 

36 
* Candidates who elect not to write a thesis must take two additional busi- 
ness courses in place of Thesis. 
**LA 673 Business Law I and LA 674 Business Law II are recommended. 

Required Undergraduate Courses 

Financial Accounting Concentration 

Course Number and Title Credit 

A 111 Introductory Accounting I 3 

A 112 Introductory Accounting II 3 

A 221 Intermediate Accounting I 3 

A 222 Intermediate Accounting II 3 

A 223 Cost Accounting I 3 

A 224 Cost Accounting II 3 

A 331 Advanced Accounting I 3 

A 332 Advanced Accounting II 3 

A 333 AuditingI 3 

A 334 Auditing II 3 

A 335 Income Tax Procedures I 3 

A 336 Income Tax Procedures II _3 

36 
Managerial Accounting Concentration 
Course Number and Title Credit 

A 111 Introductory Accounting I 3 

A 112 Introductory Accounting II 3 

A 221 Intermediate Accounting I 3 

A 222 Intermediate Accounting II 3 

A 223 Cost Accounting I 3 

A 224 Cost Accounting II 3 

A 331 Advanced Accounting I 3 

A 333 AuditingI 3 

A 335 Income Tax Procedures I 3 

A 336 Income Tax Procedures II 3 

A 339 Managerial Accounting 3 

A 341 Financial Decision Making _3 

36 
32 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING 

The overall objective of the Master of Science in Accounting program is 
to provide a framework for accounting inquiry, devised in structure and 
content from the entire scope and process of accounting-information-based 
economic decision-making. The existence of such a framework is intended to 
provide for graduate accountants and professional practitioners an op- 
portunity to share in the development and assessment of issues of account- 
ing interest within a decision-making context. Accordingly, the M.S. pro- 
gram is structured to receive its objective and direction from the overall 
objective of accounting — providing information useful to the process of 
economic decision-making. 

To accomplish this objective, the M.S. program offers a structure of 
studies designed to provide : 

1. an examination of the foundations of economic decision-making. 
( Foundation Courses, 18 credits ) ; 

2. an analysis of the role and usefulness of accounting information for 
economic decision-making. ( Core Courses, 12 credits ) ; and 

3. an opportunity for further selected specialization from the generally 
recognized branches or divisions of accounting inquiry. (Electives, 9 
credits ) 

Each student, upon entering the program, will be assigned a faculty ad- 
visor who will assist the student throughout his program of studies, par- 
ticularly with the selection of suitable electives. The assigned faculty ad- 
visor will also act as, or assist in the selection of, the students' thesis ad- 
visor. 



Degree Requirements 

A minimum total of thirty-nine (39) credits will be required for com- 
pletion to earn the Master of Science in accounting. The transfer of credit 
earned at other institutions will be permitted, subject to each of the fol- 
lowing conditions: 

a. the courses were at the graduate level; 

b. each grade earned was "B", or better; and 

c. the courses did not fulfill requirements for any other degree already 
earned by the student 

A minimum of thirty ( 30 ) credit hours must be completed at the Univer- 
sity of New Haven prior to the granting of the degree. All credits offered 
toward the Master of Science in accounting must be earned within a con- 
tinuous time span of five calendar years. 

33 



Admission Policy 

Admission to the program is open to persons holding an undergraduate 
degree from an accredited institution, preferably, but not exclusively, in Ac- 
counting or in Business Administration with a major in Accounting. Persons 
holding other than the above degrees will be required to take a number of 
selected undergraduate courses. Admission is based primarily on an appli- 
cant's undergraduate record; however, the promise of academic success is 
the essential factor for admission. In support of their application, persons 
may submit their scores from the Admission Test for Graduate Study in 
Business. An applicant may be required to take this test. 



Thesis 

All students are required to write a thesis. The thesis must show ability 
to organize material in a clear and original manner and present well-reason- 
ed conclusions. 

The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis ad- 
visor prior to the end of the tenth week of the trimester in which the can- 
didate expects to complete the requirements for his degree. The final ap- 
proved copies of the thesis must also be submitted to the Dean of the 
Graduate School 3 weeks prior to commencement. 

The thesis is deposited permanently in the Library. Students are required 
to submit two copies of the thesis for the Library. Additional copies of the 
thesis are usually required. For this requirement and other regulations re- 
garding the preparation of a thesis, students should consult the "Manual 
for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects." Copies of 
the manual are available in the Graduate School Office. 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 
THE MASTER OF SCIENCE ACCOUNTING 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

Foundation Courses 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

FI 651 Portfolio Management and Capital Market Analysis 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

18 
34 



Core Courses 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 3 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and Analysis 3 

A 698 Thesis 3 

12 
Electives 9 

Total 39 

Elective Courses 

Financial Accounting Specialization 

A 651 Financial Accounting Seminar 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 

A 653 Accounting for the Not-for-Profit Organizations 

A 656 International Accounting 

FI 649 Security Analysis 

Managerial Accounting Specialization 

A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 

A 640 Advanced Problems in Budgeting 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 

A 642 Operational Auditing 

FI 645 Corporate Financial Theory 

Taxation Specialization 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 

A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 

Two Taxation Electives 



35 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN TAXATION 

Society's decision to pursue collectively, through the instrument of gov- 
ernmental policy, a variety of economic and social goals has led to the 
development of a complex body of "tax law". Given the dynamic state of 
society's economic and social goals, and the alternative means for their 
accomplishment, the body of "tax law" characteristically exists in a con- 
tinual state of change. 

The complex and dynamic structure of "tax law" is significant not only 
because of its impact upon the process of accomplishing society's goals but 
also because of its influence upon the economic decision-making process in 
which society's members are constantly engaged. The tax consequences at 
the applicable governmental level — federal, state, and local — of economic- 
decisions made by society's members have been and will continue to be an 
increasingly important consideration. 

Program Objectives 

In recognition of the above, a need to prepare technically competent 
individuals for careers in the field of taxation has developed. Owing to the 
complex and dynamic nature of "tax law", it appears appropriate to con- 
duct this preparation at an advanced level of inquiry with an emphasis 
upon examining issues of current interest in taxation. Accordingly, the 
Master of Science Program in Taxation has been designed as a framework 
to accomplish the following structure of objectives : 

1 ) To apprise the students of the role of "tax law" relative to social 
and economic policy. 

2) To prepare students with approaches relative to the integration of 
"tax law" with the economic decision-making process. 

3) To prepare students for technical competence relative to under- 
standing and interpreting "tax law". 

4) To prepare students with approaches to independent research in 
taxation. 

5) To familiarize students with Internal Revenue procedures. 

Given the above objectives, the Master of Science Program in Taxation 
provides a framework through which advanced and timely tax training can 
be acquired by experienced professionals (accountants and attorneys) prac- 
ticing in the field of taxation, as well as individuals seeking to prepare 
themselves for entry into career positions in taxation. 

Degree Requirements 

A minimum total of 36 credits is required for the Master of Science in 
Taxation. The 36 credits will include 24 credits from required core courses 
and 12 credits from electives. The transfer of credit earned at other institu- 
tions will be permitted, subject to each of the following conditions: 

a) the courses were at the graduate level 

b) each grade earned was "B", or better 

c) the courses did not fulfill requirements for any other degree al- 
ready earned by the student. 

36 



A minimum of thirty (30) graduate level trimester credits must be com- 
pleted at the University of New Haven prior to the granting of the degree. 
All credits offered toward the Master of Science in Taxation must be earned 
within a time span of five ( 5 ) calendar years, start to finish. 

Admission Policy 

Admission to matriculation in the program is available to CPA's, attorneys, 
and persons holding an undergraduate degree from an accredited institu- 
tion, preferably, but not exclusively, in Accounting or in Business Admin- 
istration with a major in Accounting. Persons holding other than the above 
degrees will be required to take a number of selected undergraduate 
courses as a condition for admission. Admission is based primarily on an 
applicant's undergraduate record; however, the promise of academic success 
is the essential factor for admission. In support of their application, per- 
sons may submit their scores from the Graduate Management Admissions 
Test (GMAT). An applicant may be required to take this test. 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 
THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN TAXATION 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

Federal Income Taxation I 3 

Federal Income Taxation II 3 

Corporate Income Taxation I 3 

Corporate Income Taxation II 3 

Tax Accounting 3 

Estate & Gift Taxation 3 

Federal Tax Practice & Procedure 3 

Research Project in Federal Income Taxation 3 

24 

Electives 12 

Total 36 



Federal Income Tax III 

Corporate Income Tax III 

State & Local Taxation 

Consolidated Returns 

Income Taxation of Estates & Trusts 

International Taxation 

Taxation of Partnerships & Partners 



37 



A 


601 


A 


602 


A 


604 


A 


605 


A 


607 


A 


608 


A 


614 


A 


615 



Elective 


Courses 


A 


603 


A 


606 


A 


609 


A 


610 


A 


611 


A 


612 


A 


613 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE 

The MSCIS curriculum is interdisciplinary with a software orientation. It 
is designed to provide a high-level academic background for CIS managers 
and systems analysis in all career areas. A wide selection of electives allows 
the student to concentrate in either technical or business applications. 



Degree Requirements 

The basic MSCIS program consists of 48 credit hours. Up to 18 of these 
credit hours may be waived on the basis of undergraduate coursework, 
leaving a minimum requirement of 30 credit hours. All waivers must be ap- 
proved in writing by the Industrial Engineering Department, and are con- 
ditional upon subsequent academic performance. Graduate credit may be 
transferred from other accredited institutions, but in all cases the residence 
requirement for a degree shall be 30 credit hours earned at the University 
of New Haven. In some cases, the program coordinator may permit substi- 
tution of relevant courses in place of the required courses. 



Seminar Project 

The MSCIS program requires all students to complete IE-698 Seminar 
Project. This requirement is met by the preparation of a relevant 
seminar project report, prepared under the direction of a faculty ad- 
visor. Project reports must be of professional quality and formally pre- 
pared, consistent with the requirements specified in "A Manual for the 
Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects," published by the 
Graduate School. Two copies of the report are deposited in the Library. 
The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the project advisor 
prior to the end of the tenth week of the trimester in which the candidate 
expects to complete the requirements for his degree. The final approval 
copies of the project must also be submitted to the Dean of the Graduate 
School 3 weeks prior to Commencement. A student is expected to complete 
the project within twelve months of initial registration for IE 698. It is sug- 
gested that a student begin work on the seminar project after having com- 
pleted 15 to 21 credit hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects similar to the 
required Seminar Project as a part of their professional duties may petition 
to satisfy the Seminar Project requirement by taking two advanced indus- 
trial engineering electives in place of the project. Such a substitution must 
have the prior written approval of the MSCIS program coordinator. 



38 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR THE MASTER OF SCIENCE 
IN COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

IE 603C Introduction to Digital Computers (COBOL), or 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) 3 

M 610 Fundamentals of Calculus and Linear Algebra 3 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

IE 614 Data Information Systems 3 

EE 615 Computer Logic Design 3 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/Management 

Science 3 

IE 605 Advanced Business Programming I, or 

IE 606 Advanced Technical Programming II 3 

IE 610 Computer Systems Design 3 

IE 698 Seminar Project 3 

Electives (IE, Math, or EE) 9 

Electives 12 

48 



39 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

The MSIE is considered a fifth-year or professional degree, and is de- 
signed to provide a broad background in operations research, man-machine 
systems, and human factors analysis to students with undergraduate engi- 
neering or technical degrees from ECPD accredited schools. 



Degree Requirements 

The basic MSIE program consists of 48 credit hours. Up to 18 of these 
credit hours may be waived on the basis of undergraduate coursework, 
leaving a minimum requirement of 30 credit hours. All waivers must be ap- 
proved in writing by the Industrial Engineering Department, and are con- 
ditional upon subsequent academic performance. Graduate credit may be 
transferred from other accredited institutions, but in all cases the resi- 
dence requirement for a degree shall be 30 credit hours completed at the 
University of New Haven. In some cases, the program coordinator may per- 
mit substitutions of relevant courses in place of the required courses. 



Seminar Project 

The MSIE program requires all students to complete IE 698 Seminar 
Project. This requirement is met by the preparation of a relevant seminar 
project report, prepared under the direction of a faculty advisor. Pro- 
ject reports must be of professional quality and formally prepared, 
consistent with the requirements specified in "A Manual for the Prepara- 
tion of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects," published by the Graduate 
School. Two copies of the project are deposited in the Library. The 
complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the project ad- 
visor prior to the end of the tenth week of the trimester in which the can- 
didate expects to complete the requirements for his degree. The final ap- 
proved copies of the project must also be submitted to the Dean of the 
Graduate School 3 weeks prior to Commencement. A student is expected 
to complete the project within twelve months of the initial registration for 
IE 698. It is suggested that a student begin work on the seminar project 
after having completed 15 to 21 credit hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects similar to the 
required Seminar Project as a part of their professional duties may petition 
to satisfy the Seminar Project requirement by taking two advanced indus- 
trial engineering electives in place of the project. Such a substitution must 
have the prior written approval of the MSIE program coordinator. 



40 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR THE 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/Management 

Science 3 

IE 607 Probability Theory 3 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) 3 
EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis, or 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

IE 651 Human Engineering I 3 

IE 602 Quality Analysis 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior, or 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 3 

IE 698 Seminar Project 3 

Electives (IE or Math Courses) 9 

Electives 12 

48 



41 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH 

The MSOR curriculum provides thorough coverage of the theory, meth- 
odology, and application of the techniques of operations research and sys- 
tems analysis. The program is designed to prepare qualified applicants 
from diverse backgrounds to deal with major social, industrial, and business 
problems. 



Degree Requirements 

The basic MSOR program consists of 48 credit hours. Up to 18 of these 
credit hours may be waived on the basis of undergraduate coursework, 
leaving a minimum requirement of 30 credit hours. All waivers must be ap- 
proved in writing by the Industrial Engineering Department, and are con- 
ditional upon subsequent academic performance. Graduate credit may be 
transferred from other accredited institutions, but in all cases the residence 
requirement for a degree shall be 30 credit hours completed at the Univer- 
sity of New Haven. In some cases, the program coordinator may permit 
substitutions of relevant courses in place of the required courses. 



Seminar Project 

The MSOR program requires all students to complete IE 698 Seminar 
Project. This requirement is met by the preparation of a relevant 
seminar project report, prepared under the direction of a faculty ad- 
visor. Project reports must be of professional quality and formally pre- 
pared, consistent with the requirements specified in "A Manual for the 
Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects," published by the 
Graduate School. Two copies of the report are deposited in the Library. 
The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the project ad- 
visor prior to the end of the tenth week of the trimester in which the can- 
didate expects to complete the requirements for his degree. The final ap- 
proved copies of the project must also be submitted to the Dean of the 
Graduate School 3 weeks prior to Commencement. A student is expected to 
complete the project within twelve months of the initial registration for 
IE 698. It is suggested that a student begin work on the seminar project 
after having completed 15 to 21 credit hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects similar to the 
required Seminar Project as a part of their professional duties may petition 
to satisfy the Seminar Project requirement by taking two advanced indus- 
trial engineering electives in place of the project. Such a substitution must 
have the prior written approval of the MSOR program coordinator. 



42 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 
THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/Management 

SciPTiop *-3 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) 3 

IE 607 Probability Theory 3 

M 610 Fundamentals of Calculus and Linear Algebra 3 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis, or 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

IE 621 Linear Programming 3 

IE 622 Queuing Theory 3 

IE 685 Theory of Optimization 3 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 3 

IE 688 Design of Experiments 3 

IE 698 Seminar Project 3 

Electives (IE, Math, or EE) 6 

Electives 9 

48 



43 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

The President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration 
of Justice assigned a high priority to the task of improving the education 
and training of personnel entrusted with the administration of criminal 
justice in the United States. 

A key objective of the Master of Science in Criminal Justice program 
is the training and education of men and women planning careers in the 
field of criminal justice as well as the advanced training and education 
of the men and women who staff the agencies and institutions of the 
criminal justice system. 

The University views the criminal justice system as one continuous in- 
tegrated process from a study of the nature of deviant behavior to the 
role of rehabilitation and parole. 

The program stresses a broad understanding of the social and behavioral 
sciences, the institutions of the criminal justice system, and the develop- 
ment of methodological tools and skills. This is done somewhat at the ex- 
pense of courses that are narrowly professional in the belief that the field 
of criminal justice is dynamic and that a broad understanding of the social 
and behavioral sciences and the methodological skills and tools will prove 
more valuable to a student's career in the long run than narrow profes- 
sional training. 

The broad fields of the criminal justice program at the University are 
social and behavioral science, the institutions of the criminal justice sys- 
tem, and methodological tools and skills. 

The courses in the area of social and behavioral science stress the 
theories of the behavior of man in a social order and the sanctions imposed 
by different societies to control the social behavior of their members. 

Courses in the area of criminal justice institutions stress the study of the 
existing system from the police, through the courts, the penitentiaries, and 
the system of probation and parole. 

The methodological courses expose students to the tools of research and 
analysis and the contribution of systems analysis to the efficient administra- 
tion of the criminal justice system. 

Admission Policy 

All MSCJ applicants must take the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record 
Examination or the Miller Analogies Test as part of the admission pro- 
cedure. GRE applications are available in the Graduate Office or by writing 
directly to the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, N.J. 

Requirements for the Master of Science in Criminal Justice Degree 

A total of 45 credit hours is required of candidates for the degree of 
Master of Science in Criminal Justice. 

44 



Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Criminal Justice must 
complete 21 credit hours of required courses in the core curriculum. In ad- 
dition to the required core, students may select 24 credit hours of electives 
from one of three major areas of concentration. The three areas of concen- 
tration are: social and behavioral sciences, criminal justice institutions, and 
criminal justice systems. 

Electives listed are suggested electives; other electives may be taken with 
the approval of the student's advisor. 

Except for the required core, the student's program of study is deter- 
mined largely by the student and his faculty advisor. 

Credit may be given for graduate courses taken at other accredited in- 
stitutions. 

Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for thesis with the de- 
partment. The thesis must show ability to organize material in a clear and 
original manner and present well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in charge 
of the departmental thesis program or a faculty member with special com- 
petence in the subject matter covered by the thesis. The complete and final 
manuscript must be submitted to the thesis advisor prior to the end of the 
tenth week of the trimester in which the student expects to complete the 
requirements for his degree. The two final approved copies must also be 
submitted to the Dean of the Graduate School 3 weeks prior to Commence- 
ment. No final examination on the thesis is required. 

The thesis is deposited permanently in the Library. Students are required 
to submit two copies of the thesis for the Library. Additional copies of the 
thesis are usually required. For this requirement and other regulations re- 
garding the preparation of a thesis, students should consult the "Manual 
for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects." Copies of 
the manual are available in the Graduate School Office. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR THE MASTER OF SCIENCE 
IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE DEGREE 
Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 3 

CJ 605 Seminar in Social Deviance 3 

CJ 607 Seminar in Criminal Justice Institutions 3 

CJ 628 Introduction to Systems Theory 3 

CJ 635 Statistics in the Public Sector 3 

CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 3 

CJ 642 Research Techniques in the Social 

Sciences 3 

Electives 24 

45 
45 



Areas of Concentration 
Social and Behavioral Science 



CJ 


602 


Seminar in Social Control 


cj 


604 


Seminar in Theory and Philosophy of Law 


CJ 


609 


Criminological Theory 


cj 


620 


Sociology of Criminal Law 


CJ 


622 


Learning Theory: Applications in 
Criminal Justice 


cj 


624 


Group Process in Criminal Justice 


cj 


630 


Delinquency and Juvenile Crime 


CJ 


658 


Psychiatry and the Law 


CJ 


672 


Innovative Treatment Programs in 
Corrections 


p 


631 


Social Psychology 


p 


633 


Problems of Drug Abuse 


p 


634 


Personality Assessment 


p 


636 


Abnormal Psychology 


PS 


601 


Constitutional Law 


PS 


602 


Civil Liberties and Rights 


PS 


605 


Criminal Law 


SO 


601 


Minority Group Relations and Urban 
Sociology 


so 


605 


Culture and Personality 


so 


609 


Comparative Social Organization 



CJ 
CJ 
CJ 


608 
610 
612 


CJ 

cj 


613 
615 


CJ 
CJ 


617 

618 


cj 


619 


CJ 

cj 
cj 


644 
651 
655 


cj 


670 


PA 


604 



Criminal Justice Institutions 

Law and Evidence 
Administration of Justice 
Concepts and Issues in Police 

Administration 
Alternatives for Criminal Prosecution 
Forensic Science in the Administration 

of Justice 
Correctional Administration 
Probation and Parole: Theory and 

Practice 
Seminar in Comparative Criminal Justice 

Systems 
Police in Urban Society 
Problems in the Administration of Justice 
Bureaucratic Organization of Criminal 

Justice 
Selected Issues in Criminal Justice: 

Topics to Vary 
Seminar in Communities and Social 

Change 



46 



IE 603 


IE 604 


IE 610 


IE 614 


IE 621 


IE 683 


IE 688 


IE 689 


CJ 


690 


cj 


691 


CJ 


693 


cj 


694 


cj 


695 


CJ 


697 


cj 


698 


cj 


699 



Criminal Justice Systems 

Introduction to Digital Computers 
Management Systems 
Computer Systems Design 
Data Information Systems 
Linear Programming 
Systems Analysis 
Seminar in Inferential Statistics 
Seminar in Descriptive Statistics 

Independent Study 

Research Project I 
Research Project II 
Criminal Justice Internship I 
Criminal Justice Internship II 
Independent Study 
Thesis I 
Thesis II 
Thesis HI 



47 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

The environmental sciences program is intended to meet the needs of 
scientists for academic work in environmental studies beyond the baccalaure- 
ate level. The program is interdisciplinary in nature and incorporates science 
and engineering courses. This program is designed to accommodate the 
student with a degree in one of the natural sciences. 

There exists today a need for a substantial number of scientists knowl- 
edgeable in environmental areas. Industries which are required to control 
the pollution of air and water need environmental scientists. Federal, state 
and local governments must hire employees and consultants to assist them 
in environmental matters. Other new vistas will undoubtedly open to the 
environmental scientists of the future. Environmental scientists will be in 
increasingly greater demand with the continually increasing problems of 
pollution. 

The recognition and solution of environmental problems are largely the 
responsibility of scientists and engineers. To perform effectively in this 
massive effort, they must be technically competent as well as knowledgeable 
in social and economic matters. 

This program provides the advanced educational skills necessary to meet 
the ever increasing need for scientists with an environmental background. 
It is designed to offer vigorous, professionally oriented, science and engin- 
ering courses in the areas of solid waste, water, and air pollution. 

Approximately two-thirds of the program consists of a required sequence 
of courses which each student must complete. The balance of the program 
consists of courses selected from the list of electives. Selection will be based 
on the student's principal field of interest. Each student, upon entering this 
program, will be assigned a faculty advisor who will consult with the student 
during his program of study and will assist the student in selection of suit- 
able electives. The faculty advisor will also act as the student's research 
project advisor. 

Degree Requirements 

A total of 39 credit hours must be completed to earn the Master of Science 
in Environmental Sciences degree. The transfer of credit earned at other in- 
stitutions will be allowed under the rules of the Graduate School and subject 
to the following conditions: a) the courses were at the graduate level, b) 
each grade was B or better, and c) the courses did not fulfill requirements 
for any other degree already earned by the student. A minimum of thirty 
graduate level credit hours must be completed at the University of New 
Haven prior to the granting of a degree. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the environmental sciences program would 
be expected to have a degree in one of the natural sciences where certain 
prerequisite courses have been completed. Students without these courses 
would be admitted to the program after completing these prerequisites. 

48 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR THE MASTER OF SCIENCE 
IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

CE 601 Water Treatment, or 

CE 602 Wastewater Treatment 3 

CE 605 Solid Waste Management 3 

CE 606 Environmental Law & Legislation, or 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 3 

SC 601 Ecology for Environmental Engineers 3 

SC 602 Pollutants & the Aquatic Environment 3 

SC 603 Air Pollution 3 

SC 607 Characterization & Treatment of Wastes w/Lab 3 

SC 608 Water Quality .., 3 

SC 612 Freshwater & Marine Biology 3 

SC 690 Research Project 3 

Electives (Approved) 6 



39 



Suggested Electives 

SC 621 Microbiology 
SC 622 Bacteriology 



49 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 

The environmental engineering program is intended to meet the needs 
of engineers for academic work beyond the baccalaureate level. The pro- 
gram is interdisciplinary in nature and incorporates both engineering and 
science courses. 

There exists today a need for a substantial number of engineers knowl- 
edgeable in environmental areas. Industries which are required to control 
the pollution of air and water need environmental engineers. Federal, state 
and local governments must hire employees and consultants to assist them 
in environmental matters. Other new vistas will undoubtedly open to the 
environmental engineers in the future. Environmental engineers will be in 
increasingly greater demand with the continually increasing problems of 
pollution. 

The recognition and solution of environmental problems are largely the 
responsibility of engineers and scientists. To perform effectively in this 
massive effort, they must be technically competent as well as knowledgeable 
in social and economic matters. 

This program provides the advanced educational skills necessary to meet 
the ever increasing need for engineers with an environmental background. 
It is designed to offer vigorous, professionally oriented, engineering and 
science courses in the areas of solid waste, water, and air pollution. 

Approximately two-thirds of the program consists of a required sequence 
of courses which each student must complete. The balance of the program 
consists of courses selected from the list of electives. Selection will be based 
on the student's principal field of interest. Each student, upon entering 
this program, will be assigned a faculty advisor who will consult with the 
student during his program of study and will assist the student in selection 
of suitable electives. The faculty advisor will also act as the student's re- 
search project advisor. 



Degree Requirements 

A total of 39 credit hours must be completed to earn the Master of Science 
in Environmental Engineering degree. The transfer of credit earned at other 
institutions will be allowed under the rules of the Graduate School and sub- 
ject to the following conditions: a) the courses were at the graduate level, 
b) each grade was B or better, and c) the courses did not fulfill require- 
ments for any other degree already earned by the student. A minimum of 
thirty graduate level credit hours must be completed at the University of 
New Haven prior to the granting of a degree. 



Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission in the environmental engineering program are 
expected to have an engineering degree from an institution accredited by 
the Engineers Council for Professional Development. 

50 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR THE MASTER OF SCIENCE 
IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

Water Treatment 3 

Wastewater Treatment 3 

Solid Waste Management 3 

Environmental Law & Legislation, or 

Economics for Public Administrators 3 

Environmental Chemistry 3 

Ecology for Environmental Engineers 3 

Pollutants & the Aquatic Environment, or 

Air Pollution 3 

Advanced Wastewater Treatment 3 

Research Project 3 

Electives (CE) 6 

Electives (Approved) 6 

39 



CE 


601 


CE 


602 


CE 


605 


CE 


606 


EC 


608 


CH 


601 


SC 


601 


SC 


602 


SC 


603 


CE 


612 


CE 


690 



51 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

This program is intended to meet the needs of professionally employed 
engineers and scientists for academic work beyond the baccalaureate level. 
It has been designed to deepen the understanding of modern analysis and 
synthesis techniques as they apply to engineering design. A major goal of 
this program is to provide a thorough discussion of the characteristics of 
the latest devices and systems and of their applications in current engineer- 
ing design. Both analytical and numerical procedures are developed with 
particular emphasis on the use of computers for problem solving and as 
elements in larger systems. 

The program centers on a core sequence which all students are expected 
to take. The core courses contain advanced methods of analysis and design 
which are of common interest to electrical engineers. Each student com- 
pletes his program by electing courses that are particularly suited to his 
current professional interests. In general the elective courses must be chosen 
from those listed below. Early in his program the student, with the help and 
approval of his advisor, prepares a detailed plan insuring an overall edu- 
cational experience that is integrated and logical. All decisions regarding 
both core and elective courses are subject to the final approval of the 
student's advisor. 

Degree Requirements 

A minimum Total of 39 credit hours must be completed to earn the Master 
of Science in Electrical Engineering degree. The transfer of credit earned at 
other institutions will be allowed within the rules of the Graduate School and 
under the following conditions: a) the courses were at the graduate level; 
b) each grade was B or better; and c) the courses did not fulfill require- 
ments for any other degree already earned by the student. All credits offer- 
ed toward any degree must be earned within a continuous time span of five 
years. 

Admission Policy 

Admission to the program is open to persons holding an undergraduate 
engineering degree from an institution accredited by the Engineers Council 
for Professional Development (ECDP). Though admission decisions are 
based primarily on an applicant's undergraduate record, the promise of 
academic success is the essential factor for admission. 

Thesis 

There is no specific thesis requirement for the Master of Science in Elec- 
trical Engineering. However, students are encouraged to submit a thesis 
proposal covering applied research in an area of mutual interest to the stu- 
dent and a supervising member of the faculty. If a proposal shows promise 
of yielding a worthwhile contribution to the professional objectives of the 
student and a faculty member accepts the role of supervisor, the student 
may embark upon the research and earn 6 elective credits. Students elect- 
ing to do a thesis project will be expected to make an oral presentation of 
the results of the project. 

52 



The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis ad- 
visor prior to the end of the tenth week of the trimester in which the candi- 
date expects to complete the requirements for his degree. The final approved 
copies of the thesis must also be submitted to the Dean of the Graduate 
School 3 weeks prior to commencement. 

The thesis is deposited permanently in the Library. Students are required 
to submit two copies of the thesis for the Library. Additional copies of the 
thesis are usually required. For this requirement and other regulations re- 
garding the preparation of a thesis, students should consult the "Manual 
for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects." Copies of 
the manuals are available in the Graduate School Office. 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR THE MASTER OF SCIENCE 
IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

EE 601 Engineering Analysis I 3 

EE 602 Engineering Analysis II 3 

M 620 Numerical Analysis 3 

IE 685 Theory of Optimization 3 

EE 603 Discrete & Continuous Systems I 3 

EE 604 Discrete & Continuous Systems II 3 

EE 630 Electronic Instrumentation I 3 

EE 640 Computer Engineering I 3 

EE 650 Random Signal Analysis 3 

Electives (Approved) 12 

39 



Modern Control Systems 

Computer Aided Design 

Electronic Instrumentation II 

Digital Signal Processing I 

Digital Signal Processing II 

Computer Engineering II 

Power Systems Engineering I 

Power Systems Engineering II 

Microprocessors — Theory & Applications 

Special Topics — Electrical Engineering 

Independent Study I 

Independent Study II 

Thesis I 

Thesis II 



53 



Elective 


Courses 


EE 


605 


EE 


608 


EE 


631 


EE 


634 


EE 


635 


EE 


641 


EE 


645 


EE 


646 


EE 


670 


EE 


680 


EE 


695 


EE 


696 


EE 


698 


EE 


699 



MASTER OF ENGINEERING 

This program is intended to meet the needs of professionally employed 
engineers and scientists for academic work beyond the baccalaureate level. 
It has been designed to increase competence in modern analysis and syn- 
thesis techniques as they apply to engineering design. Both analytical and 
numerical procedures are developed with particular emphasis on the appli- 
cations of the digital computer to the solution of engineering problems. 

The program centers on a core sequence which all students are expected 
to take. The core courses contain advanced methods of analysis and design 
which are of common interest in engineering work. Also included in the 
core requirements are courses taken in the School of Business Administra- 
tion. They are intended to enhance the student's understanding of modern 
business methods and practice. The courses are designed to take advantage 
of the student's background in engineering and adapted to meet his needs 
for concentrated study in areas of finance, accounting, economics and ad- 
ministration. 

The core sequence develops techniques and models of engineering sys- 
tems within a broad framework including topics of immediate interest in 
all branches of engineering. In particular, the analytical and numerical 
methods of the core are prerequisites for the elective courses. 

Each student completes his program by electing a series of courses in 
Mechanical engineering that are particularly suited to his current profes- 
sional interests. Early in his program the student, with the approval of his 
advisor, prepares a detailed plan insuring an overall educational experience 
that is integrated and logical. All decisions regarding both core and elective 
requirements are subject to the final approval of the student's advisor. 

Thesis 

There is no specific thesis requirement for the Master of Engineering de- 
gree. However, students are encouraged to submit a thesis proposal cover- 
ing applied research in an area of mutual interest to the student and a super- 
vising member of the faculty. If a proposal shows promise of yielding a 
worthwhile contribution to the professional objectives of the student and a 
faculty member accepts the role of supervisor, the student may embark 
upon the research and earn 6 elective credits. 

The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis ad- 
visor prior to the end of the tenth week of the trimester in which the candi- 
date expects to complete the requirements for his degree. The final ap- 
proved copies of the thesis must also be submitted to the Dean of the Grad- 
uate School 3 weeks prior to commencement. 

The thesis is deposited permanently in the Library. Students are required 
to submit two copies of the thesis for the Library. Additional copies of the 
thesis are usually required. For this requirement and other regulations re- 
garding the preparation of a thesis, students should consult the "Manual 
for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects." Copies of the 
manual are available in the Graduate School Office. 

54 



Degree Requirements 

A minimum total of 39 credits must be completed to earn the Master of 
Engineering Degree. The transfer of credit earned at other institutions will 
be allowed within the rules of the Graduate School and under the follow- 
ing conditions: a) the courses were at the graduate level; b) each grade was 
B or better; and c ) the courses did not fulfill requirements for any other de- 
gree already earned by the student. All credits offered toward the Master 
of Engineering Degree must be earned within a continuous time span of five 
years. 



Admission 

Admission to the program is open to persons holding an undergraduate 
engineering degree from an institution accredited by the Engineers Council 
for Professional Development (ECPD). Though admission decisions are 
based primarily on an applicant's undergraduate record, the promise of aca- 
demic success is the essential factor for admission. 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR THE MASTER 
OF ENGINEERING DEGREE 



Required Courses 

Course Number and Title 



Credit 



EE 601 


Engineering Analysis I 


3 


M 624 


Applied Mathematics 


3 


M 620 


Numerical Analysis 


3 


IE 685 


Theory of Optimization 


3 


EC 603 


Microeconomic Analysis" 


3 


EC 604 


Macroeconomic Analysis* 


3 


MG 637 


Management* 


3 




Electives 


18 



39 

'Other courses may be substituted with the written approval of an 
advisor. 



55 



Mechanical Engineering 



Elective Courses 


Course Numbt 


ME 610 


ME 611 


ME 615 


ME 616 


ME 620 


ME 621 


ME 622 


ME 625 


ME 626 


ME 630 


ME 631 


ME 632 


ME 635 


ME 640 


ME 645 


ME 660 


ME 680 


ME 690 


ME 698 


ME 699 



Credit 



Mechanics I 3 

Mechanics II 3 

Theory of Elasticity I 3 

Theory of Elasticity II 3 

Classical Thermodynamics I 3 

Classical Thermodynamics II 3 

Statistical Thermodynamics 3 

Mechanics of Continua I 3 

Mechanics of Continua II 3 

Advanced Compressible Fluid Flow I .... 3 

Advanced Compressible Fluid Flow II 3 

Advanced Heat Transfer 3 

Advanced Turbomachinery 3 

Combustion 3 

Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat 

Transfer 3 

Advanced Design Philosophies 3 

Special Topics — Mechanical Engineering 3 

Research Project 3 

Thesis I 3 

Thesis II 3 



56 



DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/ 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

The Graduate School has always encouraged interdisciplinary studies. To 
foster a broader expertise in the areas of Business Administration and In- 
dustrial Engineering, a student can now earn both the Master of Business 
Administration and the Master of Science in Industrial Engineering by suc- 
cessfully completing the Dual Degree Program. The program is intended 
for students with undergraduate engineering or technical degrees from 
ECPD accredited schools. 



Degree Requirements 

The basic MBA/MSIE program consists of 72 credit hours. Up to 12 of 
these credit hours may be waived on the basis of undergraduate course 
work, leaving a minimum requirement of 60 credit hours. All waivers must 
be approved in writing by the appropriate department and are conditional 
upon subsequent academic performance. Graduate credit may be trans- 
ferred from other accredited institutions, but in all cases the residence re- 
quirement for the two degrees shall be 60 credit hours completed at the 
University of New Haven. In addition, a minimum of 21 credit hours must 
be earned in business courses and a minimum of 21 credit hours must be 
earned in engineering courses. 



Thesis 

Students may elect to write a thesis or seminar project. The thesis or 
project must show ability to organize material in a clear and original manner 
and present well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis/project is written under the direction of the faculty member 
in charge of the departmental program or a faculty member with special 
competence in the subject matter covered by the thesis/project. The com- 
plete and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis/project advisor 
prior to the end of the tenth week of the trimester in which the candidate 
expects to complete the requirements for his degree. The final approved 
copies of the thesis/project must also be submitted to the Dean of the Grad- 
uate School 3 weeks prior to Commencement. 

The thesis/project is deposited permanently in the Library. Students are 
required to submit two copies of the thesis/project for the Library. Addition- 
al copies of the thesis/project are usually required. For this requirement and 
other regulations regarding the preparation of a thesis/project, students 
should consult the "Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and 
Seminar Projects." Copies of the manual are available in the Graduate 
School Office. 

57 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR 

THE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/ 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING DEGREE 

Required Courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

MK 609 Marketing 3 

QA 605 Advanced Statistics 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior, or 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 3 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/Management 

Science 3 

IE 602 Quality Analysis 3 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) 3 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

IE 607 Probability Theory 3 

IE 621 Linear Programming 3 

IE 651 Human Engineering I 3 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 3 

Thesis (Business), or Seminar Project (IE) 3 

Electives (Business) 6 

Electives (IE or Math) 6 

Electives (unrestricted) 6 

72 



58 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Department of Accounting 

A600 Accounting No Credit 

The principles and procedures underlying the generation of financial 
accounting information. 

A601 Federal Income Taxation I 

An introduction to tax policy and the basic principles of the Federal In- 
come Tax Law. Coverage entails the key concepts of gross income, adjusted 
gross income, deductions, exemptions and credits, with special attention 
given to the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code affecting individual 
taxpayers. 

A602 Federal Income Taxation II 

A continuation of Federal Income Taxation I emphasizing the basic pro- 
visions concerning dispositions of property: analysis of basis, recognition 
of gain or loss, capital asset transactions and non-recognition exchanges. 
Coverage extended to assignment of income theories, tax minimization and 
maxi-tax and deferred payment sales. 

A603 Federal Income Taxation III 

Advanced concepts of Federal Income Taxation. Further study of capital 
gains and losses including stock options, mortgages, bootstrap sales, sale of 
patent rights and know-how, sale of copyrights and tax shelter and deferral 
techniques. Principles of income in respect of a decedent are also intro- 
duced. 



A604 Corporate Income Taxation I 

A foundation course analyzing the basic Federal income provisions affect- 
ing corporations and shareholders. Course coverage includes organization 
of the corporation, corporate capital structure, corporate distributions, stock 
redemptions, bail-out techniques and liquidations. 

A605 Corporate Income Taxation II 

A detailed analysis of the Federal income tax rules covering corporate re- 
organizations and divisions. Also discussed are some of the non-tax aspects 
of corporate reorganizations such as, S.E.C., anti-trust, and business reasons 
for choice of particular method. 

A606 Corporate Income Taxation III 

Advanced study in the corporate tax area including sub-chapter S cor- 
porations, collapsible corporations, accumulated earnings tax, affiliated cor- 
porations and carryover of corporate tax attributes. 

59 



A607 Tax Accounting 

Investigation of such areas as: problems of allocating income and de- 
ductions to the proper tax year, permissible tax accounting methods, de- 
preciation, inventory methods, net operating losses, installment reporting, 
change in accounting method and comparison of business and tax account- 
ing principles. 

A608 Estate and Gift Taxation 

A comprehensive introduction to, and analysis of, the Federal estate and 
gift tax laws including basic principles of estate planning. Procedures for 
preparation of the estate and gift tax returns are treated. Brief coverage is 
also given to state death and inheritance taxes. 

A609 State and Local Taxation 

The tax problems encountered at the state and local level by businesses 
engaged in interstate commerce. Federal limitations on the taxation of multi- 
state enterprises and jurisdictional problems are examined. Specific areas 
covered are: license to do business, net income, franchise, gross receipts, 
propertv and sales and use taxes. Apportionment problems are examined 
in detail. 

A610 Consolidated Returns 

A thorough analysis of the Federal consolidated tax return provisions in- 
cluding eligibility, and whether to file a consolidated taxable income; inter- 
company transactions and deferral concepts; basis in the disposition of stock 
of a subsidiary; computation of earnings and profits; and mechanics of 
preparing the consolidated return. 

A611 Income Taxation of Estates and Trusts 

Federal income taxation of estates, trusts, grantors, and beneficiaries. 
Topics are simple and complex trusts, throwback rules, taxable and dis- 
tributable net income, assignment of income concepts and income in re- 
spect of a decedent — preparation of the estate and trust returns. 

A612 International Taxation 

Consideration of the Federal income tax treatment of non-resident aliens 
and foreign corporations and the foreign income of U. S. residents and 
domestic corporations; comparison of alternative methods of engaging in 
operations abroad; foreign tax credit; allocations under Code Section 482; 
Section 367 rulings; and the effect of tax treaties. 

A613 Taxation of Partnerships and Partners 

A study of the Federal income tax problems encountered in the formation 
and operation of a partnership, including computations of taxable income, 
sale of a partnership interest, withdrawal of a partner, death or retirement 
of a partner, and distribution of partnership assets. Limited partnerships are 
also covered. Procedure for preparation of the partnership return. 

60 



A614 Federal Tax Practice and Procedure 

A study of the history and organization of the Internal Revenue Service, 
the selection of returns for audit and the review steps at the administrative 
level. Code provisions covered will include: filing requirements, statutory 
notices, restrictions on assessment, statute of limitations, refund procedures, 
waivers, closing agreements, protests, and rulings. 

A615 Research Project in Federal Income Taxation 

This course is devoted to a study of the techniques and tools of tax re- 
search. Reference sources studies include tax loose-leaf servics, I.R.S 
Cumulative Bulletin, court cases, Congressional committee reports, text- 
books and published articles. A significant research paper devoted to a 
subject of topical interest is required. 

A640 Advanced Problems in Budgeting 

A comprehensive analysis of the principles and practical applications of 
budgeting for profit and not-for-profit organizations. The scope and limi- 
tations of the budgeting process is examined with a view to assessing its 
usefulness for both long and short-range decision-making. 

Prerequisite: 6 hours of Cost Accounting 

A641 Accounting Information Systems 

An examination of the function and limitations of internal accounting in- 
formation systems and their relationship to other decision-oriented business 
information systems. 

Prerequisite : A621 

A642 Operational Auditing 

An analysis of the principles underlying and the procedures applying the 
function of auditing the results of firm-related business decisions. 

Prerequisite: A621 

A650 Advanced Accounting Theory 

Considers the theoretical aspects of accepted accounting principles and 
their significance as a frame of reference for the evaluation of accounting 
practices. Considerable attention is focused on the role of regulatory 
agencies and professional accounting organizations with regard to their 
influences upon accounting theory and practice. 

Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of Intermediate Accounting. 

A651 Financial Accounting Seminar 

An examination and evaluation of current literature in external account- 
ing issues and related fields. 

Prerequisite : A650 

A652 Advanced Auditing 

An analysis of the contemporary problems surrounding the attest function 
performed by the professional independent auditor. 

Prerequisite : 3 hours of Auditing 

61 



A653 Accounting for the Not-for-Profit Organizations 

An intensive examination of the contemporary views toward financial re- 
porting for the not-for-profit organizations. 

Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of Intermediate Accounting 

A654 Financial Statements: Reporting and Analysis 

An examination of financial reporting practices for financial statement 
analyses in view of modern theoretical and empirical financial decision- 
making research. 

Prerequisite: FI651 

A656 International Accounting 

An analysis of the literature related to the current and growing interest 
in the development of accounting standards for business enterprises through- 
out the world. 

Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of Intermediate Acounting 

A661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 

An examination and evaluation of current literature in internal accounting 
issues and related fields. 

Prerequisite: A621 

A690 Research Project 

Independent study under the supervision of an advisor 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor 

A698 Thesis 

Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student's progress 
toward the completion of the thesis. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 



Department of Civil Engineering 
CE601 Water Treatment 

Advanced design principles and practices in water treatment processes; 
study of unit processes and operations; water treatment plant design; meth- 
ods of population projection; water distribution systems. 

CE602 Wastewater Treatment 

Advanced design principles and practices in sewage treatment processes; 
study of unit processes and operations; secondary sewage treatment plant 
design; sludge handling and disposal; sewage collection systems; intro- 
duction to advanced treatment methods. 

62 



CE605 Solid Waste Management 

Characteristics, volumes, collection and disposal of solid waste and refuse. 
Design of processing, recycling, and recovery equipment, landfill design 
and operation, resource recovery, incineration. 

CE606 Environmental Law & Legislation 

Review and techniques of enforcement of state and federal pollution con- 
trol laws and regulations; effects on waste treatment criteria and design and 
evaluation of municipal ordnances; preparation of environmental assess- 
ments and impact statements. 

CE612 Advanced Wastewater Treatment 

Theories and principles of advanced sewage treatment including nutrient 
removal, demineralization, distillation, ozonation, carbon filtration, ion 
exchange, nitrification; design of facilities; upgrading secondary plants. 

Prerequsite: CH601 which may be taken con- 
currently 

CE613 Industrial Wastewater Control 

Characteristics of industrial wastes, volumes, sources, types; methods of 
volume reduction, waste segregation, recovery, recycle, and waste treatment. 

Prerequisite: CH 601 

CE614 Water Pollution Control 

Causes and effects of pollution on marine water bodies; study of chemical, 
biological, physical characteristics and responses; tidal effects; survey, 
sampling and modeling; dredge spoil disposal; estuarine ecology. 

CE615 Rural and Agricultural Waste Disposal 

Handling and disposal of domestic wastewaters in rural areas; character- 
istics and treatment of agricultural wastewaters and waste solids; lagooning, 
composting, soil injection and application. 

CE616 Ground Water Waste Disposal 

Study of effects of disposal of wastewaters in ground waters; travel of 
pollutants through soil; removal of nutrients and pollutants by soil interac- 
tions; leachate identification and control from refuse disposal areas. 

CE617 Special Problems in Wastewater Management 

Solutions to problems in sewer infiltration, combined sewers and sewer 
separation; management techniques of sewer systems, user charges and 
capital cost recovery in municipal sewage collection and treatment facili- 
ties. Preparation of Cost Effectiveness Studies. 

CE618 Air Pollution Control 

Sources and effects of air pollution, monitoring, sampling and modeling, 
design of incineration devices and treatment facilities. Enforcement tech- 
niques, complex sources, computer simulation. 

63 



CE680 Special Topics — Civil Engineering 

A study of related topics of particular interest to students and instructor. 
Course may be taken more than once. 

CE690 Research Project 

Independent study under the guidance of an advisor into an area of 
mutual interest, each study terminating in a technical report of academic 
merit. Research may be in such environmental areas as water resources, 
stream pollution, solid waste management, and air pollution. 

Prerequisite: 18 graduate hours or by permis- 
sion of Chairman of Civil En- 
gineering Department and advisor 

CE698 Thesis I 

Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student's progress 
in the preparation of a thesis. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 

CE699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: CE698 

CH601 Environmental Chemistry 

Advanced study of the chemical reactions necessary to understand the 
impact that man's activities have on the environment. Areas considered in- 
clude water and air pollution, power generation, and the release and use 
of industrial organic chemicals. 



Department of Criminal Justice 

CJ601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 

Interpersonal communication in teaching, supervision, and in various 
work relationships. The criminal justice worker as a resource person and 
facilitator of others is stressed. Humanistic psychology and interpersonal 
psychology provide the theoretical base. Maximum enrollment 20 students. 

CJ602 Seminar in Social Control 

An examination of the formal and informal mechanism of controlling 
or conditioning the social behavior of man vis-a-vis the system of social 
norms, laws, and institutions. The implication of organizing the system of 
justice under a punishment or rehabilitative ethic will be considered. 

CJ604 Seminar in Theory and Philosophy of Law 

The theory and philosophy of law and the relationship between law and 
society. Emphasis on the nature of the judicial process, the issues of law 
and personal morality, non victim crimes, and the relationship of enforce- 
ment agencies to the rule of law. 

64 



CJ605 Seminar in Social Deviance 

A survey of theories relating to the scope and nature of the crime problem. 
Consideration of the problems of deviancy, including social norms and 
deviancy, mental disturbances, juvenile crime, and the various possible and 
actual responses to deviancy. Various approaches to the problem of re- 
habilitation. 

CJ607 Seminar in Criminal Justice Institutions 

The institutions of law and law enforcement. Institutions as rehabilita- 
tion centers and the effective administration of such centers. 

CJ608 Law and Evidence 

Comprehensive analysis of the rules of evidence. Topics include judicial 
notice, presumptions, the nature of real and circumstantial evidence, hear- 
say evidence, confessions and admissions, and witnesses. Emphasis on evi- 
dence in criminal cases. 

CJ609 Criminological Theory 

An analytical review of the multidisciplinary theories of criminal be- 
havior. The impact of various theoretical constructs and concepts on prac- 
tice will be critically evaluated. 

CJ610 Administration of Justice 

The machinery of justice in theory and practice. The rule of law and its 
exceptions in the actual administration of justice. Emphasis on the pro- 
gressive changes in the development of childrens' and adolescents' courts, 
probation, and classification clinics. Crime prevention and reforms of the 
criminal law. Special problems of justice and the poor. Administrative 
denials of justice, the insane offender, the white-collar criminal, and social 
reconstruction through law. 

CJ612 Concepts and Issues in Police Administration 

The development of the theory and practice of police administration in 
the United States. Significant developments and ideas of those who have 
made major contributions to American police administration. 

CJ613 Alternatives to Prosecution 

Areas to be covered will be the history, theory and practice of pre-trial 
diversion, as well as the legal, social and administrative problems inherent 
in diversionary approaches. Among the specific alternatives to be examined 
will be: youth service bureaus, family courts, citizen dispute settlement, 
community responsibility programs, and various pre-trial intervention pro- 
grams. 

CJ 615 Forensic Science in the Administration of Justice 

The role of the natural science in the Administration of Justice in its 
broadest aspects. Current concepts, present status, and future needs of the 
forensic sciences. Specific topics in the forensic sciences and its inter- 
relationship with legal issues would also be included. 

65 



CJ617 Correctional Administration 

The basic organization and objectives of a department of correction. 
Specific administrative principles required for effective conduct and opera- 
tion of a correctional organization. 

CJ618 Probation and Parole: Theory and Practice 

The philosophy, theory, and methods employed in probation, parole, and 
institutional treatment of the offender. The role of authority, casework, 
classification, treatment policy, and administrative organization in deter- 
mining the consequences of correctional practice. 

CJ619 Seminar in Comparative Criminal Justice Systems 

A cross cultural study of police, court, and correctional systems and 
methods. 

CJ620 Sociology of Criminal Law 

A study of the social origins and consequences of criminal law and legal 
processes. Emphasis on problems of legal change and the structure and 
functioning of legal sanctions. Emphasis on social and institutional pres- 
sures in creating socio-legal policy. 

CJ622 Learning Theory: Applications in Criminal Justice 

Applications of the psychology of learning to police and correction settings. 

CJ624 Group Process in Criminal Justice 

Small group interaction; both theoretical and experimental facets of group 
process are presented. Group counseling and encounter groups. 

CJ628 Introduction to Systems Theory 

Concepts of systems theory and systems analysis in contemporary socio- 
technical environments. 

CJ630 Delinquency and Juvenile Crime 

A general introduction to the field of delinquency and crime, including 
all aspects of the social, legal, and personal matrix out of which these forms 
of behavior emerge. Special emphasis will be given to the process and im- 
plications of delinquency labeling. 

CJ635 Statistics in the Public Sector 

Statistical techniques applied to the public sector. Descriptive statistics: 
measures of central tendency and variability. Introduction to statistical in- 
ference including sampling distributions and tests of significance. Some 
techniques of non-parametric statistics, multiple regression, and elementary 
decision theory. Analysis of variance and co-variance. 

66 



CJ637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 

Topics selected by students relating to current issues and concerns in 
the field of criminal justice. Each student will be required to write a paper 
and deliver an oral presentation on his selected topic. 

CJ642 Research Techniques in the Social Sciences 

Research methodology as applied to problems and issues in the field of 
criminal justice. 

CJ644 Police in Urban Society 

An introduction to some of the current thinking and problems of policing 
in urban society. The course will examine such issues as the historical growth 
of the police, the role and mission of the police, measurement of the police 
tasks, police corruption and other topics of interest to the seminar members. 
The course will stress the development of analytic thinking in defining and 
dealing with police problems. 

CJ651 Problems in the Administration of Justice 

A critical analysis will be made of significant problems or obstacles in 
organization of social justice. Formal and informal processes and their in- 
teractional functions will be critically examined. 

CJ655 Bureaucratic Organization of Criminal Justice 

Through an application of modern organizational theory, a critical analy- 
sis of criminal justice agencies will be made. Emphasis will be placed on 
viewing criminal justice in theoretical perspective. Linkages between theory 
and operationalization of principles will be made. 

CJ658 Psychiatry and the Law 

An examination of issues that relate to the interaction between the law 
and mental illness and the general role of forensic psychiatry. 

CJ670 Selected Issue: Seminar on Violence 

An in-depth analysis of the role and forms of violence in American so- 
ciety. Emphasis is upon the roots, expressions, control and functions of ag- 
gressivity and assaultive behavior by individuals and groups. 

CJ671 Selected Issue: Court Backlog 

This seminar examines the phenomenon of overcrowding in the Criminal 
Courts and focuses on the possible reasons for the apparent inability of 
criminal justice to deal both fairly and effectively with an increasing volume 
of criminal cases. 

CJ672 Innovative Treatment Programs in Corrections 

The theory and practice of a wide range of innovative correctional 
treatment modalities will be analyzed. Students will be given the oppor- 
tunity to participate in various experiential exercises and to develop and 
propose new treatment approaches. 

67 



CJ673 Selected Issue: Prosecution, Processes and Activities 

An examination of the role of the prosecutor in the criminal justice sys- 
tem and the interrelationship with other components of the system. In 
particular, prosecutorial discretion, the possibility of its abuse and the de- 
sired degree of its visibility will be considered. 

CJ674 Selected Issue: Lower Criminal Courts 

This seminar analyzes the obstacles which hinder the delivery of quality 
criminal justice on the lower court level and examines efforts — past, pres- 
ent and future — at improving the performance of those courts. 

CJ675 Selected Issue: Judicial Behavior 

An examination of judicial discretion as it relates to the criminal justice 
system, its interrelationship with the other components of the system, its 
limitations and/or advantages and if and how it should be controlled. 

CJ676 Selected Issue: Practicum in Clinical Interviewing 

The application of interpersonal and counseling theory to the interview 
situation. Analysis of tape recorded interviews from the perspective of both 
theory and research. Therapeutic as well as nontherapeutic interviewing 
strategies will be examined and practiced. 

CJ677 Selected Issue: Outstanding Practitioners Series 

Leading experts from the criminal justice field present their major philo- 
sophies and ideas. Practitioners from law enforcement, corrections and the 
courts will participate, and post lecture discussion sessions conducted by 
a faculty member will critique and analyze the presentations. 

CJ678 Selected Issue: Corruption in Criminal Justice 

An examination of the nature, extent and consequences of corruption, 
crime and deviance in criminal justice agencies. Special emphasis on re- 
search and policy-making issues. 

CJ679 Selected Issue: Seminar on Victimology 

An examination of the "victimology" perspective in criminology and 
criminal justice. The course traces the history of victimology, examines 
the major empirical studies dealing with victim-precipitation, analyzes the 
legitimacy and value of the construct, and considers contemporary re- 
sponses to crime which incorporate the principles of victimology, such as 
the "target-hardening" approach to crime prevention. 

CJ690 Research Project I 

Individual guidance on a research endeavor; this may include work on 
a thesis. 

CJ691 Research Project II 

Prerequisite: CJ690 

68 



CJ693 Criminal Justice Internship I 

The student's formal educational development will be complemented by 
field placement experience in various criminal justice settings or agencies. 
Field experience will be supervised by designated agency and departmental 
personnel. 

CJ694 Criminal Justice Internship II 

Prerequisite: CJ693 

CJ695 Independent Study 

Student will engage in a directed independent learning experience. The 
topic and format to be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty. 

CJ697 Thesis I 

Period meetings and discussions of the individual student's progress to- 
ward the completion of the thesis. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 

CJ698 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: CJ697 

CJ699 Thesis III 

Prerequisite: CJ697, CJ698 

Department of English 

E600 The Uses of Language No Credit 

Limited to qualified international students who speak a language other 
than English. Emphasis upon conversation, pronunciation, composition, 
and laboratory work in the English language. 



Department of Economics 

EC603 Microeconomic Analysis 

Topics in resource allocation and price determination. Theories of 
choice of consumers, firms, resource owners under monopoly, monopsony, 
competition, and alternative market forms. 

EC604 Macroeconomic Analysis 

An examination of the roles of consumption, investment, government 
finance, and money influencing national income and output, employment, 
the price level, and rate of growth. Policies for economic stability and 
growth. 

69 



EC608 Economics for Public Administrators 

An examination of the roles of consumption, investment, government 
expenditure, and money influencing national income, output, employment, 
and price level, and growth rate. Special emphasis upon the roles of fiscal 
and monetary policy and the economics of contemporary social problems. 

EC620 Economic History of Western Europe 

A survey of the economic development of western Europe from 1500 to 
the present. Topics covered include mercantilism, industrilization, imperial- 
ism, and the emergence of planned economics. 

EC625 Industrial Relations 

A survey of the problems, strategies and policies of management and 
unions in conflict situations and in harmonizing labor-management relations. 
Labor legislation, collective bargaining and alternative strategies, produc- 
tivity and other problem areas in labor-management relations are examined. 

EC629 Public Policies Toward Business 

A survey of the economic aspects of government and business relations. 
Emphasizes the concept of public control over certain types of business and 
certain forms of business activity. Combination movements, pricing pro- 
cedures, anti-trust laws and agencies enforcing them, regulation of trans- 
portation and public utilities, rate-making for transport, pricing public 
utility services, consumer protection, and social responsibility. 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604 

EC630 Structure of American Industry 

An examination of several major U.S. industries such as automobiles, 
steel, petroleum, defense, and agriculture. Some contemporary problems 
are analyzed. A study of the powerful economic forces acting on these in- 
dustries and how firms react to these forces. 

EC635 Comparative Economic Systems 

The study of Capitalism, Socialism, Communism and other economic 
systems will be examined with respect to their theoretical foundations and 
practical applications, including the interrelationship between economic, 
political and social institutions. 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604 

EC641 International Economics 

A study of the basic theory and major institutions of international 
economic relations. Examines critically the techniques and background of 
protectionism and free trade, and the analysis of customs unions, and price 
and exchange rate changes. The theory of comparative advantage, the gains 
from trade and the terms of trade. The balance of payments and national 
income. Capital movements and economic growth. The evolution of the 
world economy and international economic institutions. Effects of growth 
on trade, and trade on growth. Monopolistic practices in international trade. 
The international monetary system and international monetary reforms. 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604 

70 



EC645 Seminar in Macroeconomic Policy 

The impact of fiscal and monetary policy upon employment, output and 
prices. An analysis of past and current economic controls and their impact 
upon the economy. 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604 

EC653 Econometrics 

A presentation of the important statistical concepts used in econometrics. 
Topics covered are regression theory, multiple regression, regression ex- 
tensions, correlation, serial correlation, correlated regressor and error, the 
identification problem, selected estimating techniques. 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604 

QA 604-605, or permission of the 
instructor 

EC658 Transportation Economics 

A study of the principal economic problems arising in connection with 
the development and regulation of railroads and other modes of transport. 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604 

EC660 Economic Development of Japan 

A study in the modernization and economic growth of modern Japan 
since the Meiji Restoration (1869). Topics include the role of government 
and planning, and of foreign trade, investment, and technology; resource 
allocation, economic organization, capital formation, agricultural policies, 
population growth, and social change. 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604 

EC665 Urban and Regional Economic Development 

Structure of the urban and regional economy; goals processes, problems 
and policy in urban and regional economic development. 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604 

EC670 Economics of Crime 

Topics include the economic costs of crime; the costs of preventing crime; 
the impact of white collar crime on American society. 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604 

EC687 Collective Bargaining 

Emphasis on the negotiating process. The labor contract as it involves 
wages, worker security, management authority, and handling of grievances 
arising during the life of the contract. 

Prerequisite: EC 625 

EC690 Research Project 

Independent study under the supervision of an advisor. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor. 

71 



EC691 Labor Legislation 

Considers the legal status of unions as set forth in state and federal 
legislation, and court decisions. Reviews recent NLRB rulings. Protective 
legislation dealing with wages, hours, child labor, and accident and un- 
employment compensation. 

Prerequisite: EC 625 

EC695 Readings in Economics 

EC698 Thesis 

Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 



Department of Electrical Engineering 

EE601 Engineering Analysis I 

Application of multidimensional linear vector space concepts to the 
analysis and synthesis of engineering systems. Topics include matrices, lin- 
ear transformations, orthogonality, function spaces, and the resolutions of 
signals. 

EE602 Engineering Analysis II 

Applications of the methods of complex variables and their analytic 
functions to engineering systems. Topics include analytic function theory, 
conformal mapping, transform methods and transfer functions. 

EE603 Discrete & Continuous Systems I 

Discrete and continuous linear system models. State variable representa- 
tion and transfer function representation. Feedback control systems, sta- 
bility performance and design criteria. State variable and compensation 
synthesis. Non linear systems, describing functions and phase plane tech- 
niques. Stability methods of Liapunov. 

Prerequisite: EE601 

EE604 Discrete & Continuous Systems II 

Prerequisite: EE603 

EE605 Modern Control Systems 

Advanced topics in control systems. May include optimal control, dy- 
namic programming, variational approaches, adaptive control, sampled data 
systems, signal modulated systems, random signal methods. 

Prerequisite: EE604 



EE608 Computer Aided Design 

Numerical algorithms for engineering systems analysis. The design prob- 
lem and performance measures. Optimization of networks and filters. Para- 
meter sensitivities. Device modeling and equivalent circuits. 

Prerequisite : EE601 

EE615 Computer Logic and Intelligence 

Introduction to logic elements and to their application in digital net- 
works for processing numerical data. The course will deal with analysis and 
design techniques and will include the following topics: logic variables, 
switching functions, optimal realizations, Karnaugh maps and tabular pro- 
cedures, multivariable systems. Detailed consideration of coding, parity bit 
redundancy, and error detecting and correcting schemes will be presented. 
Design examples will include logic circuits for addition, multiplication, 
counting, parity generation and detection. 

Prerequisites: IE603 ( or equivalent ) 

EE630 Electronic Instrumentation I 

Design of modern electronic instrumentation. Circuit and system ex- 
amples, critical evaluation and design techniques. Emphasis on practical 
applications including design theory and the circuit techniques used in 
linear integrated devices. Variety of electronic instrumentation including 
computer interfaces, signal conditioners, waveform generators and shapers, 
filters, V/F, A/D, D/A converters and other special purpose circuits. 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 

EE631 Electronic Instrumentation II 

Prerequisite: EE630 

EE634 Digital Signal Processing I 

A study of the theories of digital signal processing and their applications. 
Topics include discrete time signals, Z transform, the discrete Fourier 
Transform, the FFT, digital filter design techniques, homomorphic signal 
processing, and various applications of digital signal processing. 

Prerequisite : EE603 

EE635 Digital Signal Processing II 

Prerequisite: EE634 



EE640 Computer Engineering I 

A study of the structure and organization of PDP11-10 computer. Op- 
erating system peripheral devices, addressing memory, assembler instruc- 
tion set, programmed requests, real-time soft ware modules. Assembler 
language programming. 

73 



EE641 Computer Engineering II 

Applications of computers to physical systems for monitor control func- 
tions. Interfacing using hardware modules. Case studies may include 
synchronous motor transient studies, shock wave phenomena, dynamic 
chemical reaction monitoring and control, signal processing, sampled data 
control systems. Students must complete a project. 

Prerequisite: EE640 

EE645 Power Systems Engineering I 

Concepts and methods of analysis and design of modern power systems 
will be treated. This will include the network representation of power 
systems, matrix methods symetrical components, and the use of the com- 
puter in the solution of problems such as short circuit fault calculations, 
load flow study, economic load despatching and stability. Other topics 
may be included such as protection, relaying, transmission system design. 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 

EE646 Power Systems Engineering II 

Prerequisite: EE645 

EE650 Random Signal Analysis 

A study of the theory of random signals and processes. Topics include 
a review of probability, random signals, auto and cross correlation, power 
spectral density, spectral analysis of random signals, signal detection and 
estimation in noise. 

EE670 Microprocessors — Theory & Applications 

A study of the techniques and methods of designing digital systems using 
a central processor unit and a programmable read only memory. Micro- 
computer assembly language, operating systems, input/output devices, 
programmable read only memories and interfacing. Students must complete 
a project. 

Prerequisite: EE640 

EE680 Special Topics — Electrical Engineering 

A study of selected topics of particular interest to students and instructor. 
Course may be taken more than once. 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 

EE695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study or research under the supervision 
of a faculty member. 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 

EE696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: EE695 

74 



EE698 Thesis I 

Individual student project under supervision of faculty advisor. Written 
and oral report required. Student must enroll in 6 credits of thesis. 

Prerequisite: Completion of 15 credits of grad- 



uate work 



EE699 Thesis II 

Continuation of Thesis I. 



Department of Finance 

FI615 Finance 

The investment, financing, and valuation of business firms. Topics in- 
clude: discounted cash flow, return on investment, investment decisions un- 
der uncertainty, long and short term sources of funds, optimal financial 
structure, cost of capital, dividend policy, expansion, merger, and failure 
and reorganization. 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604 
QA604 
A 600 or equivalent 

FI617 Financial Institutions and Capital Markets 

This course stresses the relationship between the financial system and 
the level, growth, and stability of aggregate economic activity. Analyzes 
the institutional and theoretical structure of monetary change and the 
manner in which financial institutions and markets transmit and influence 
the impact of monetary policy. Special attention to the role of nonmonetary 
financial intermediaries, the structure and regulation of capital markets, and 
the functions of market yields as the price mechanism that allocates saving 
to various categories of economic investments. 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604 
QA604 

FI619 Monetary and Central Banking Policy 

The impact of monetary change upon employment, output, and prices; 
and the formulation and execution of Federal Reserve Policy designed to 
regulate money, credit, and interest rates. 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604 
QA604 

FI645 Corporate Financial Theory 

An analysis of the theoretical structure supporting optimum financial de- 
cision-making by the business firm. Emphasis is placed upon the determina- 
tion of the combination of investment, financing, and dividend decisions 
that maximizes the valuation of the firm within a security market context. 

Prerequisites: FI 615 
FI651 

75 



FI649 Security Analysis 

An analysis of the determinants of valuation for fixed income securities, 
common stocks, convertible securities and common stock warrants. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the information and techniques relevant to security 
valuation and selection and the structure and workings of the securities 
markets. 

Prerequisite: FI 651 

FI651 Portfolio Management and Capital Market Analysis 

Considers the theoretical structure for the procedures (security analysis, 
portfolio analysis and portfolio selection) which constitute the process of 
portfolio management, as well as their limitations in practice. Additional at- 
tention is placed upon the logical implications of portfolio analysis for capi- 
tal market theory. 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604 
QA604 
A 600 (or equivalent) 



FI655 Commodity Market Analysis 

A conceptual and operational examination of the markets in which com- 
modities are traded, the participants and major exchanges including an an- 
alysis of the major commodities traded and the factors influencing their 
prices. 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604 
QA604 



FI661 Real Estate: Principles and Practices 

Real estate from the investor's point of view. Impact of taxation on real 
estate investments. Emphasis on commercial land use through the use of 
case studies and problems. 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604 
QA604 



FI690 Research Project 

Independent study under the supervision of an advisor. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor 



FI698 Thesis 

Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 

76 



Department of Hotel and Restaurant Administration 

HM610 Seminar in Hotel Management Theory 

Detailed analysis of current developments in the hospitality and travel 
industries. 

HM620 Financial Management 

Utilization of mathematical techniques applicable to solving managerial 
and technical problems involving investment decisions, real estate site 
selection, property evaluation, and financial analysis. 

HM625 Supervisory Analysis 

An incident approach is used to provide a cross section of small business 
situations that have faced hospitality oriented management. Emphasis is 
given to particular situations involving leadership, organization, communi- 
cations, ethical behavior, and social responsibilities. 

HM630 Personnel Relations Management 

Topics include organizational behavior, personnel selection, placement, 
supervision, job evaluation, wage and salary administration, motivation, and 
union-management relations. Case studies and role playing are integral 
parts of the course. 

HM640 Executive Cuisine Development 

An advanced course which covers current methods and principles of food 
preparation, variety, and garnishments. Emphasis placed on evaluation and 
preparation. Topics include Haute Cuisine, Convenience, and International. 
Demonstration only. 

HM655 Small Business Enterprise 

Cases have been selected to stimulate the student in opportunities, risks 
and ingredients necessary for success in a hospitality small business entrep- 
reneurial career. Through case discussions on starting or purchasing com- 
panies, students obtain practice in dealing with such matters as finding a 
suitable opportunity, appraising profit potential, determining an acceptable 
purchase price, negotiating terms, and raising capital. 

HM690 Research Project 

Independent study under the supervision of an advisor. 

HM698 Thesis 

Periodic meetings and discussion of the individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 

77 



Department of International Business 

IB643 International Business Operations 

A summary of the economic, foreign environment and instructional con- 
cepts and constraints encountered by international business. How they ap- 
ply to decisions by managers of business operations and makers of official 
policy. 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604 

IB644 Import and Export Business 

A managerial approach to international marketing; emphasis on con- 
trollable and uncontrollable variables effecting marketing strategies; evalua- 
tion of foreign suppliers; methods of financing imports and exports; and, 
documentation for import and export marketing. 

Prerequisites: MK 609 Marketing 

IB 643 International Bus. Opera- 
tions 

IB645 Structure of World Markets 

In this course an intensive study is made of Asia, Western Europe, East- 
ern Europe, and South America as a complementary trade region for the 
United States firm. The area is surveyed as a present and potential market 
as well as an import source. Consideration is given to the historical and 
racial background of the people, their political, social and educational de- 
velopment; the resources and economic development of the countries in the 
area; and, business practices unique to the area and its countries. 

Prerequisites: MK 609 Marketing 

IB 643 International Bus. Opera- 
tions 

IB651 Comparative Marketing 

A systematic study of the national and regional basis of socioeconomic 
conditions and of distributive business activities. The analysis of interna- 
tional similarities and differences in marketing functions, structures, pro- 
cesses, and actors, as related to the physical, economic, political, social, and 
cultural environments. The dynamic changes underway in marketing sys- 
tems are also considered. 

Prerequisites: MK 609 Marketing 

IB 643 International Bus. Opera- 
tions or Permission of instructor 

IB652 Multinational Business Operations 

Managerial problems and strategies in foreign operations; structuring 
international operations through acquisition, licensing, or joint venture; the 
assessment of local competition; the impact of foreign environments; and, 
legal, political, and cultural problems facing the multinational firm in its 
relationship with its host countries. 

Prerequisites: MK 609 Marketing 

IB 643 International Bus. Opera- 
tions or Permission of instructor 

78 



IB698 Thesis 

Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual students' progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

Prerequisite : 15 graduate hours 



Department of Industrial Engineering 

IE601 Introduction to Operations Research/Management Science 

Introduction to the techniques and philosophies of management science 
and operations research. Topics include linear programming, inventory 
analysis, queuing theory, dynamic programming, decision analysis, and 
other management techniques. 

Prerequisites: M610 or differential calculus, and 
IE607 or QA604 or equivalent 

IE602 Quality Analysis 

Concepts of quality control and statistical quality analysis. Sampling 
techniques and decision processes. 

Prerequisite: IE 607 

IE603C Introduction to Digital Computers: COBOL 

An introduction to the basic elements of computer science, including com- 
puter hardware, software, information and data processing. Programming 
concepts are introduced using COBOL, a common business-oriented lan- 
guage. A student who has taken IE 603F will not be given credit for IE 
603C. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00 

IE603F Introduction to Digital Computers: FORTRAN 

An introduction to the basic elements of computer science, including com- 
puter hardware, software, information and data processing. Programming 
concepts are introduced using FORTRAN, a common language that is well 
suited for scientific and technical work. A student who has taken IE 603C 
will not be given credit for IE 603F. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00 

IE604 Management Systems 

Techniques of industrial and governmental systems management, includ- 
ing systems analysis, cost-benefit analysis, organizational theory, and sched- 
uling and planning techniques. 

IE605 Advanced Business Programming 

Advanced programming in COBOL or other business-oriented language 
within an applied business systems context. 

Prerequisites: IE 603C or proficiency in lan- 
guage similar to COBOL 
Laboratory Fee: $10.00 

79 



IE606 Advanced Technical Programming 

Advanced programming in FORTRAN or other technically-oriented lan- 
guage with emphasis on scientific and technical applications. 

Prerequisites: IE 603F or proficiency in a lan- 
guage similar to FORTRAN 
Laboratory Fee: $10.00 

IE607 Probability Theory 

Probability of events. Random variables and expectations; discrete and 
continuous distributions; important standard distributions and applica- 
tions; moment generating functions; central limit theorem. 

Prerequisites: M610 or equivalent 

IE610 Computer Systems Design 

Techniques for designing, installing, and operating computer systems 
and their peripheral equipment. Concepts of decisions with respect to 
compiler and hardware selection. Development of operating procedures, 
form design, systems charting, and documentation. 

Prerequisites: IE 603 and IE 614 

IE61 1 Budgeting and Control 

An analytical approach as applied to the principles and policies of opera- 
tional budgeting and control of expense and capital investments. Includes 
forecasting techniques, development of totally integrated systems with tra- 
ditional financial statements and controls from top management to first 
line supervision. 

Prerequisite: A 600 

IE612 Managerial Interactions I 

An interdisciplinary systems approach to human behavior in organiza- 
tions, with emphasis on the impact of industrial engineering methods on or- 
ganizational performance. The first course will deal with individual moti- 
vation and face-to-face interaction in managerial roles: the second concen- 
trates on organizational development, job enrichment, and modern work at- 
titudes. 

IE613 Managerial Interactions II 

Prerequisite: IE 612 

IE614 Data Information Systems 

Introduction to automated information systems planning and operations 
and their impact on management decision-making, control functions, and 
communication capabilities. An overview of concepts and procedures with 
applications in urban environments, large organizations, and governmental 
agencies. Selected case studies are analyzed. 

Prerequisite: IE 603 or equivalent 

80 



IE615 Transportation and Distribution 

Introduction to transportation science with emphasis on physical distri- 
bution problems. Survey of operations research models and optimization 
strategies and their roles in transportation systems management. 

Prerequisite: IE 601 

IE619 Enterprise Design and Evaluation 

An analysis of the principles and methods used in estimating the prob- 
able economic characteristics of proposed enterprises. The student is re- 
quired to formulate a proposed enterprise, including the technical, finan- 
cial, and organizational requirements. 

Prerequisite: IE 601 

IE621 Linear Programming 

Thorough coverage of the techniques and applications of linear pro- 
gramming: a powerful operations research tool for optimal allocation of 
limited resources in linear systems. 

Prerequisites: M 610 or equivalent, and IE 601 
or equivalent 

IE622 Queuing Theory 

Elements of queuing theory including finite and infinite cases. Single 
server and multiple server parallel channels, series queues, and special 
cases are analyzed. Experimental methods, including simulation, are pre- 
sented in the context of industrial environments. 

Prerequisites: IE 601 and IE 607 

IE623 Decision Analysis 

Decision theory, game theory, and stochastic decision processes. Benefit- 
cost analyses under uncertainty. 

Prerequisites: QA 605 or IE 607 

IE631 Production Engineering 

An analysis and practical application of engineering activity that results 
in the transformation of natural resources into a finished product. 

Prerequisites: IE 601 and IE 602 

IE641 Quality Control Economics 

An economic managerial analysis of statistical quality control sampling 
and control chart systems with application to accepted and hybrid systems. 

Prerequisites: IE 602 and IE 607 or QA 604 

IE643 Reliability and Maintainability 

The basic theory and methodology of reliability and maintainability, in- 
cluding application of discrete and continuous distribution and statistical 
designs. Reliability, estimation, structure models, and growth models. 

Prerequisites: IE 602 and IE 607 or QA 604 

81 



IE651 Human Engineering I 

A broad coverage of the physiological, psychological, and sociological 
aspects of man and the society in which he lives and works. Special topics 
include human factors, motivation, group dynamics, and elastics. 

IE652 Human Engineering II 

Prerequisite: IE 651 

IE655 Value Engineering 

Consideration of value analysis from the point of view of design, manu- 
facturability, procurement, installation, and maintainability in order to 
optimize value in products. 

IE670 Current Topics in Computer and Information Science 

An examination of new developments or current practices in computer 
and information science. A topic will be selected for thorough study; pos- 
sible subject areas include data structures, recent hardware or software ad- 
vances, specialized applications. 

Prerequisites: IE 601 and IE 603 or permission 
of instructor 

IE671 Current Topics In Operations Research 

An examination of new developments or current practices in operations 
research. A topic will be selected for thorough study; possible subject areas 
include non-linear programming, network theory, scheduling techniques, 
specialized applications. Content may vary from semester to semester. 

Prerequisites: IE 601 and IE 607 or permission 
of instructor 

IE672 Current Topics in Industrial Engineering 

An examination of new developments or current practices in industrial 
engineering. A topic will be selected for thorough study — possible subject 
areas include reliability, production engineering, human factors, specialized 
applications. Content may vary from semester to semester. 

Prerequisites: IE 601 or permission of instructor 

IE681 System Simulation 

A study of the behavior of systems using computer simulation models of 
their organizational structure and decision criteria. 

Prerequisites: IE 603F and IE 601 or equivalent 
Laboratory Fee: $10.00 

IE682 Compiler Design 

Design and operation of assemblers and macro processors. Introduction 
to compiler design. Metalanguage. Lexical and syntactic analysis. Inter- 
pretative systems Control of translation, loading, and execution. Relocating 
loaders and overlay generation. Symbolic coding systems. 

Prerequisites: IE 605 or IE 606 or permission of 
the instructor 

82 



IE683 Systems Analysis 

Techniques and philosophies defining the concept of systems analysis are 
presented in detail and illustrated with large scale case studies. Diverse 
systems are analyzed covering the social, urban, industrial, and military 
spheres. Techniques presented include utility theory, decision analysis, and 
technological forecasting. 

Prerequisites : IE 601 or QA 605 

IE684 Multiprogramming Systems 

Topics in the areas of operating systems and computer architecture. Multi- 
programming and multiprocessor systems. Dynamic storage allocation and 
virtual memory systems. Time-sharing systems. On-line, real-time systems. 

Prerequisites: IE 605 or IE 606 or permission 
of the instructor 

IE685 Theory of Optimization 

Nonlinear and dynamic programming with special reference to computer 
analysis of optimization problems. 

Prerequisites: Calculus and IE 603F or equiva- 
lent 

IE686 Inventory Analysis 

Inventory theory and practical applications in operating inventory sys- 
tems. Model construction, optimization, and computer simulation. 

Prerequisites: IE 601 and IE 607 or QA 605 

IE688 Design of Experiments 

Inferential statistical designs, including basic statistical tests and analysis 
of variance. 

Prerequisite: Three credit hours of statistics. 

IE689 Seminar in Descriptive Statistics 

Satistical theories and applications of correlation analysis, multiple linear 
regression, nonlinear regression, and analysis of covariance. 

Prerequisite: Three credit hours of statistics. 

IE695 Special Studies 

Independent study under the guidance of an advisor into an area desig- 
nated by the program coordinator. 

Prerequisite: Only by permission of program 
coordinator 

IE698 Seminar Project 

Independent study under the guidance of an advisor into an area of mu- 
tual interest, such study terminating in a technical report of academic 
merit. Research may constitute a survey of a technical area in industrial 
engineering, operations research, or computer science, or may involve the 
solution of an actual or hypothetical technical problem. 

Prerequisites: Fifteen credit hours and permis- 
sion of program coordinator 

83 



Department of Business Law 

LA673 Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 

Survey of the legal aspects of contracts and the results of contractual 
obligations. Legal problems stemming from the distribution of goods; gen- 
erally the rights and duties of buyers and sellers and the remedies avail- 
able to them. 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604 
QA604 

LA674 Busines Law II: Business Organizations and Negotiable Instruments 

Basic introduction to problems of formation and operation of legal 
groups and general legal survey of the role of agency, partnerships and 
corporations and other complex entities in modern society. 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604 
QA604 



Department of Mathematics 

M610 Fundamentals of Calculus and Linear Algebra 

Review of algebra. Topics from calculus, including differentiation and 
integration methods, infinite series, and Taylor series. Linear algebra, sys- 
tems of linear equations, and matrix methods. 

Prerequisite: M 115 or equivalent 

M620 Numerical Analysis 

Algorithms for obtaining numerical solutions on computers; topics in- 
clude: solution of nonlinear equations by iterative methods, matrix inver- 
sion, evaluation of determinants, and solution of systems of linear equations 
by direct and iterative methods, numerical integration, differentiation, and 
solution of differential equations by finite difference methods. 

Prerequisites: 9 credit hours of calculus and 
programming ability in FOR- 
TRAN 

M624 Applied Mathematics 

Topics in applied mathematics including ordinary and partial differential 
equations, linear analysis and boundary value problems. 



Department of Mechanical Engineering 

ME610 Mechanics I 

Kinematics and Dynamics of particles and systems of particles. Lagrange's 
equations. Hamilton's principles and canomical transformation theory. The 
inertia tensor and rigicf body motion. Introductory aspects of the mechanics 
of continua. 

Prerequisite: EE601 or Permission of the in- 
structor 

84 



ME611 Mechanics II 

Prerequisite: ME 610 

ME61 5 Theory of Elasticity I 

Cartesion tensor notation, integral theorems, orthogonal curvilinear co- 
ordinates. Stress tensor, dynamical conservation equations, isotropy and 
anisotropy. Boussinesq-Popkovitch potentials. Wave equations. Propagation 
and refraction of waves. Vibrations. 

Prerequisite: EE 601 

ME616 Theory of Elasticity II 

Prerequisite: ME 615 

ME620 Classical Thermodynamics I 

Phenomenological equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics. 
Formulation and application of fundamental laws and concepts, chemical 
thermodynamics. 

Prerequisite: EE 601 or Permission of the in- 
structor 

ME621 Classical Thermodynamics II 

Prerequisite: ME 620 

ME622 Statistical Thermodynamics 

Development of methods of statistical thermodynamics within the frame- 
work of the molecular theory of matter. Presentation of the role of spectra 
and intermolecular forces in the interpretation of thermodynamic prop- 
erties of ideal systems, gases, solids and plasmas. 

Prerequisite: ME 621 

ME625 Mechanics of Continue I 

Tensor analysis, the stress vector and the stress tensor, kinematics of de- 
formation, material derivative, fundamental laws of continuum mechanics, 
conservation theorems, constitutive laws, and representative applications. 

Prerequisite: EE 601 or Permission of the in- 
structor 

ME626 Mechanics of Continua II 

Prerequisite : ME 625 

ME630 Advanced Compressible Fluid Flow I 

Properties of gases at high temperatures. Gas flows involving ionization 
and chemical reactions. High speed and non steady flows. Plasma flows. 

Prerequisites: ME 625, ME 626 

ME631 Advanced Compressible Fluid Flow II 

Prerequisite: ME 630 

bo 



ME632 Advanced Heat Transfer 

Review of the basic concepts of conduction and radiation, detailed treat- 
ment of laminer, turbulent, free and forced convectional flows. Computa- 
tional projects. 

Prerequisite: ME 621 

ME635 Advanced Turbomachinery 

Design and analysis considerations of modern turbomachinery. Projects 
requiring computer aided analysis and design based on recently published 
information. 

Prerequisite: ME 630 

ME640 Combustion 

Introductory statistical thermodynamics and physical properties of gases, 
chemical reactions in gases, combustion phenomena, aerodynamics of flames, 
and detonation phenomena. Design considerations of combustion chambers 
and burners and associated instabilities. 

Prerequisite: ME 631 

ME645 Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer 

Current methods of computer solutions of the conservation equations of 
fluid dynamics. Viscous, uncompressible, compressible and shocked flows. 
Real gas equations of state. Computer projects. 

Prerequisites: ME 631 (M 620 concurrently) 

ME660 Advanced Design Philosophies 

Open to advanced students. Seminar series on state-of-the- art techniques 
including objectives and philosophies of design. Guest lectures by recog- 
nized industrial experts. Complete design project required of all students. 

ME680 Special Topics— Mechanical Engineering 

A study of selected topics of particular interest to students and instructor. 
Course may be taken more than once. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

ME695 Special Studies 

Independent study under the guidance of an advisor into an area desig- 
nated by the program coordinator. 

Prerequisite: Permission of program coordi- 
nator 

ME698 Thesis I 

Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

Prerequisite : 15 graduate hours 

ME699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: ME 698 

S6 



Department of Management Science 

MG622 Business Analysis 

Current topics in supervision, management, personnel relations, and re- 
lated problem areas confronted by the corporate manager. 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604 
QA 604-605 

MG625 Systems Techniques in Business Administration 

An integrated study of the techniques for solving administrative prob- 
lems, including the analysis and improvement of organization structures, 
ofBce procedures, forms design, records management, reports and equip- 
ment standards. The conduct of a comprehensive systems survey using these 
techniques is explored in depth as are flow charting and the preparation of 
manuals. 

MG633 Managerial Economics 

A study of the application of the major tools of economic analysis to the 
problems encountered by management in the organization of the firm. 
Topics include the theory and measurement of consumer demand, mea- 
surement and control of costs, the effects of public policy upon managerial 
decisions, and pricing techniques and the allocation of capital within the 
firm. 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604 
QA 604-605 

MG637 Management 

A survey of the literature of management theory. Based on a wide range 
of independent reading, the student is provided the opportunity to analyze 
and assess the contribution by major writers in the field of management 
theory. 

MG650 Venture Management 

Deals with the establishment of a new business venture, covering such 
topics as site development, market analysis, staffing, inventory control, per- 
sonnel relations, and funding. 

Prerequisites: A 621, FI 615, MG 637, MK 609 
or permission of the instructor 

MG653 Seminar in Managerial Economics 

Application of Managerial Economics to selected problems encountered in 
management of the corporation-such as evaluation of costs, returns on alter- 
native investment policies and pricing plans. Problems of implementation 
covered through analysis of broad range of cases where uncertainty has 
major bearing on managerial decisions. Application and use of economic 
tools such as forecasting, capital investment analysis, and risk analysis are 
part of this structure. 

Prerequisite: MG 633 or permission of the in- 
structor 

87 



MG660 Comparative Management 

The main focus of this course is to develop an understanding of man- 
agerial practices in different countries. A conceptual framework is develop- 
ed for the analysis of interaction between managerial processes and cultural 
factors as they affect the management of enterprises in various countries. 

Prerequisite: MG 637 

MG661 Development of Management Thought 

Study of the literature from various disciplines in order to determine the 
thinking and practices of leaders of organizations, past and present. The 
historical perspective of management thought will be developed The con- 
tributions of religion, philosophy, economics, sociology and psychology to 
management thought and practice will be examined. Emphasis on pioneer- 
ing works in the management of organizations. Case studies of the thinking 
and practices of famous leaders of American business enterprises. 

Prerequisite: MG 637 

MG662 Organization Theory 

A survey of the literature on theories of organization with emphasis on 
contemporary theories. Application of the theories to management and or- 
ganizational problems will be attempted. Difficulties arising between theory 
and practice will be examined. 

Prerequisite: MG 637 

MG663 Leadership in Organizations 

Examination of theories and research findings from the behavioral sci- 
ences that are relevant to leadership in organizations. The role of the leader 
within the organization; the prerequisites for and knowledge and practices 
required for successful leadership will be studied. Programs for the de- 
velopment of leaders will be explored. 

Prerequisite: MG 637 

MG664 Organizational Effectiveness 

Identification of the criteria necessary for developing and maintaining ef- 
fective organizations. A study of the concepts that may be utilized in the 
management of these criteria. Approaches that may be utilized in develop- 
ing managers in the use of these concepts will be examined and applied to 
problem situations through cases and role-playing. 

Prerequisite: MG 637 

MG669 Business Policy and Strategy 

Management policies and strategies for the complex organization oper- 
ating in a dynamic environment are examined from the viewpoint of the 
top-level executives of the organization. Develops analytical frameworks for 
the management of the numerous elements involved in assuring the fulfill- 
ment of the goals of the total organization. Integrates the student's general 
business knowledge with the required courses in the MBA program. Em- 
phasis is placed on the development of oral and written skills by the ex- 
amination and discussion of cases. 

Prerequisites: MG 637 and 3 credit hours of 
600 level MG coursework 

88 



MG680 Current Topics in Business Administration 

An integrative course that will examine the role of business in society 
and relate the business firm to its social, political, legal, and economic en- 
vironment. While the exact content of this seminar is expected to vary from 
semester to semester in accordance with the varied academic interests and 
professional backgrounds of different faculty handling the course, the basic 
theme is the role of the business firm as the "keeper" of the market 
mechanism and the means for organizing resources in the economy. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor. 



MG685 Research Methods in Business Administration 

Designed to familiarize the administrator with the tools and potentiali- 
ties of social research and to assist him in the presentation, interpretation, 
and application of research data. 

MG690 Research Project 

Independent study under the supervision of an advisor. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor 

MG695 Readings in Management 

MG698 Thesis 

Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 



Department of Marketing 

MK609 Marketing 

An intensive study of modern marketing methods and concepts. Includes 
a review of marketing fundamentals, a study of the decision-making prob- 
lems encountered by the marketing executive, and the relation of marketing 
to environmental forces. 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604 

MK616 Analysis of Buyer Behavior 

An examination of the principal comprehensive household and organiza- 
tional buyer behavior models and the behavioral science theories upon 
which such applied models are based. The buyer is analyzed at the indivi- 
dual level, at the social level, and at the organizational level. 

Prerequisite: MK 609 

89 



MK639 Marketing Research and Information Systems 

A managerial approach to marketing information flow, including recogni- 
tion of information needs and an overview of marketing research as part 
of an information system. Special attention to evaluation of research design 
and measurement methods, effective utilization of research output, and 
problems encountered in establishing a marketing information system. 

Prerequisites: MK 609 
QA 605 

MK641 Marketing Management 

The treatment of the basic decision problems of marketing management 
in terms of a conceptual framework for analysis. Consideration of the role 
played by human judgments and the mathematical tools available to aid 
in these judgments in a number of marketing areas, notably market an- 
alysis, pricing decisions, advertising decisions, promotional decisions, and 
selection of distribution channels. 

Prerequisite: MK 609 

MK643 Product Management 

The search for new product ideas and their evaluation; the organization 
structure necessary to the development and introduction of new products 
and the management of a product line; the commercial aspects of product 
design, packaging, labeling, and branding; considerations involved in mak- 
ing product deletion decisions; and, the social and economic effects of man- 
aging product innovation. 

Prerequisite: MK 609 

MK644 Consumerism 

An analysis of the evolution of the consumerist movement; how and why 
it has developed; government agencies dealing with consumer problems; 
the impact of various market structures on the consumer; the impact of con- 
sumer oriented legislation on marketing strategies; and the responsibility 
of business to the consumer and to society. 

Prerequisite: MK 609 

MK645 Distribution Strategy 

Analysis of channel strategies; theory and economic justification of dis- 
tribution channels; direct and indirect methods of control; behavioral states 
of channel members; costing the channel; and management of changes in 
distribution. 

Prerequisite: MK 609 

MK680 Marketing Workshop 

This course is centered around a structural model of a business firm. The 
major objective is to provide the student with an opportunity to develop 
managerial insights and skills in dealing with marketing problems in a 
competitive environment. Each of the participants is grouped into decision 
making units (companies) and assumes the role of marketing executives op- 
erating a business firm. These executives will be responsible for planning, 
organizing, staffing, directing and controlling their firm's resources. 

90 



MK690 Research Project 

Independent study under the supervision of an advisor. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours and permission 
of the instructor 

MK695 Readings in Marketing 

MK698 Thesis 

Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 



Department of Psychology 

P605 Survey of Community Psychology 

An examination of historical roots and current conceptions. A social- 
problems approach to psychological dysfunction. Changing professional 
roles. Community organization and human service delivery; strategies of in- 
tervention and community change. 

P606 Seminar in Organizational/Industrial Psychology 

An examination of the professional psychologist at work in organizations. 
Emphasis on measurement methods, prediction, validation, selection, train- 
ing, performance appraisal. Practitioners in businesses, industry research or- 
ganizations, and government will provide insights into the application of 
psychological principles and methods. 

Prerequisite: P619 

P607 Special Problems in Community Psychology 

Problems of particular relevance to the Connecticut area community con- 
sultation and education. Human service issues in this geographical area. 

P609 Research Methods 

Introduction to analytic concepts pertinent to sampling techniques, re- 
search design, variable control and criterion definition. Basic problems of 
measurement, research paradigms, sources of error in research interpreta- 
tion, problems of variable identification and control, and consideration of 
the logic of inference. 

Field Experience and Practicum Seminars 

An apprenticeship or on-the-job role in an ongoing program or center. 
Emphasis on developing conceptualizations and insights as a result of in- 
volvement in the apprenticeship. Placement at a field site for 8-10 hours per 
week. Weekly class meetings serve two purposes: present specific theoretical 
material and research findings appropriate to each seminar; and allow stu- 
dents to discuss their field training experiences. 

91 



P611 Field Experience & Practicum Seminar I: The Dyadic Relationship 

Content focuses upon one-to-one relationships in community psychology. 
See general description, previous page. 

P612 Field Experience & Practicum Seminar II: Models of Consultation 

Content focuses upon community consultation. See general description, 
previous page. 

P613 Field Experience & Practicum Seminar III: Systems Intervention 

Content focuses upon intervention into and change in community sys- 
tems. See general description, previous page. 

P619 Organizational Behavior 

Analysis of various theories of business and managerial behavior empha- 
sizing the business organization and its internal processes. Psychological 
factors in business and industry, including motivation, incentives, and con- 
flict. A study of research finding relevant to an understanding and prediction 
of human behavior in organization. 

P620 Industrial Psychology 

Psychological theories and research applied to business and other or- 
ganizations. Problems and methods in selection and placement, training, 
performance appraisal, motivation, leadership, etc. 

P621 Behavior Modification 

Theory and research in behavior modification. Aversive learning, desen- 
sitization, operant conditioning. Applications in clinical and non-clinical 
settings. 

P623 Psychology of the Small Group 

Analyses of the behavior and interaction of people in mutual gratification 
groups, committees, work groups, and clubs. 

P625 Advanced Psychology of Human Development 

In depth exploration of development through the life cycle and the de- 
velopmental impact of family, neighborhood, schools, work, class, race, sex, 
etc.; Key theoretical concepts; Research findings; Community intervention. 

P627 Attitude and Opinion Measurement 

Examination of modern methods of attitude and opinion measurement. 
Scale, schedule, and interview formats. Respondent sets. Consideration of 
sampling problems. 

Prerequisite: P 609 

92 



P628 The Interview 

The interview as a tool for information-gathering, diagnosis, mutual de- 
cision making, and behavior change. Use of role-play provides the student 
with insights into nuances of interpersonal relationships. Applications to 
selection, counseling, and other situations. 

P629 Introduction to Counseling 

The roles of the client and the counselor in the counseling relation. Ex- 
amination of underlying assumptions. 

P630 Psychology of Personality 

Major personality theories and their implications. Examination of the psy- 
chological and organic factors involved in personality development and ex- 
pression. 

P631 Social Psychology 

Current problems in social psychology. Attitude scale construction, at- 
titude change, language as a social phenomena, patterns of culture, social 
class, groups, person perception, and conformity. 

P632 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 

An exploration of the emerging area of Group Dynamics. The structure 
of groups, their development, process interaction analysis, formal and in- 
formal groups, group psychotherapy and sensitivity training. 

P633 Problems of Drug Abuse 

Discussion of selected issues and current problems in drug abuse. 

P634 Personality Assessment 

A critical survey of the theories and issues of personality assessment. 
Topics include intelligence, achievement, and ability assessment. Personality 
tests and ethical questions associated with psychological testing. 

P635 Assessment of Human Performance with Standardized Tests 

Theories, assumptions, and constraints underlying construction and ap- 
plication of standardized tests employed in clinical, educational, govern- 
mental, and industrial settings. Emphasis on selection of appropriate stand- 
ardized tests for specific applications. 

Prerequisite: P 609 

P636 Abnormal Psychology 

Etiological factors in psychopathology dynamics and classification of 
neuroses, psychophysiologic conditions, psychoses, personality disorders, 
organic illness, retardation, and childhood disorders. 

P638 Psychology of Communication and Opinion Change 

Characteristics of the source, the situation, and content of messages, 
along with other variables influencing attitudinal modification. Cognitive 
factors and social settings in attitude change. 

93 



P640 Industrial Motivation and Morale 

The meaning of work; theories of motivation. Stimulus deprivation and ex- 
pectation of reinforcement; job satisfaction and motivation; pay as an incen- 
tive; interventions to increase work motivation. Case studies. 

Prerequisite: P 619 

P642 Organizational Change and Development 

The nature of organization development, intervention by third-party con- 
sultation, change in organization structure and role relationships, manager- 
ial grid, participation, conformity and deviation. 

Prerequisite: P 619 

P670 Program Evaluation in Community Psychology 

A systematic study of the processes involved in planning, implementing, 
and evaluating social service programs. The focus is on action research 
strategies which integrate the entire process from planning and grant ap- 
plication to the evaluation of the program. 

Prerequisite : P 609 

P672 Psychology of the Middle and Later Years 

A comprehensive consideration of the psychological aspects of the aging 
process. Sensation, perception, cognition, intelligence, problem-solving, 
memory and sexuality, personality changes. Disengagement, rigidity. Death 
and its anticipation. 

P680 Community Mental Health Philosophy & Concepts 

Considerations of the philosophical bases which underlie traditional ap- 
proaches to mental health. A study of the implied cultural values and atti- 
tudes which have determined the locations, the settings, the methods, and 
the objectives of mental health treatment concepts, programs, and tech- 
niques. 

P690 Individual Intensive Study 

Provides the graduate student with the opportunity to delve more deeply 
into a particular area of study under faculty supervision. 

Prerequisite: Completion of required courses 
or 24 graduate hours and written 
approval of chairman 

P691 Practicum I 

For students already employed in a managerial or supervisory role. A job- 
related research project is researched and carried out under faculty super- 
vision. 

P692 Practicum II 

Prerequisite: P 691 

94 



P693 Organizational Internship I 

For students without experience at the managerial or supervisory level. 
Under faculty supervision the student engages in field experience in an in- 
dustrial setting. 

P694 Organizational Internship II 

Prerequisite: P693 

P698 Thesis I 

An empirical study of a problem of the student's interest. 

Prerequisite: Completion of all required courses 
or 24 graduate hours and written 
approval of chairman 



P699 Thesis II 



Prerequisite: P 698 and written approval of 
chairman 



Department of Public Administration 

PA601 Principles of Public Administration 

The development, organization, functions, and problems of national, 
state, and local administration. 

PA602 Public Policy Formulation and Implementation 

The relationship between public administration and the formulation of 
public policies is studied. The implementation of public policies by ad- 
ministrators based on the politics of the administrator is examined in 
terms of interaction between various group representatives, i.e. the legis- 
lators, the politician, the pressure group leaders. 

Prerequisite: PA 601 

PA603 Resource Administration 

Growth of the concept of conserving and developing natural resources 
and its translation into public policy. Organization of the interrelationships 
among the principal resources administration agencies; the coordination 
of resources program, national, state, and local. 

PA604 Seminar in Communities and Social Change 

Interaction between the community as a social organization and educa- 
tion, police, and welfare institutions within it; special attention to con- 
ceptual frameworks and current research or action programs that impact 
particularly on minority groups. 

95 



PA605 The Communication Process 

Major emphasis on the role of communication in a democracy and the 
effects of communication content. Brief treatment of content analysis tech- 
niques, person-to-person communication, and barriers to the flow of com- 
munication. 

PA611 Research Methods in Public Administration 

Designed to familiarize the administrator with the tools and potentialities 
of social research and to assist him in the presentation, interpretation, and 
application of research data. 

PA620 Personnel Administration and Collective Bargaining in the Public 
Sector 

Study of the civil service systems of the United States and the state 
governments, including a systematic review of the methods of recruitment, 
promotion, discipline, control, and removal. 

Explores the effects on work relationships as a result of collective bar- 
gaining statutes which have been adopted by legislatures. Emphasis is 
placed on Connecticut's collective bargaining statutes. 

PA625 Administrative Behavior 

The problems faced by an administrator in dealing with interpersonal 
relationships and human processes. Analysis of individual and group be- 
havior in various governmental and business settings to determine the ad- 
ministrative action for the promotion of desired work performance. Em- 
phasis given to the public sector. 

Participation in actual problem situation discussions and case studies. 

PA630 Governmental Accounting 

A comprehensive survey of the essential principles of governmental ac- 
counting, budgeting, cost accounting, and financial reporting. The various 
operating funds, bonded debt, fixed assets, investments, classification of 
revenue and expenditures, general property taxes, and interfund relation- 
ships. 

PA632 Public Finance and Budgeting 

State and local expenditure patterns, state and local revenue sources, in- 
come taxation at the state and local level, excise taxation, sales taxation, 
taxation of capital, and the property tax. Emphasis on fiscal and economic 
aspects of federalism and federal-state fiscal coordination. The role of the 
budget in the determination of policy, in administrative integration, in 
control of government operations. 

PA633 Financial Administration 

Seminar on selected aspects of public financial administration including 
revenues, accounting, expenditures, public debt, special funds, and audit- 
ing. 



PA634 Problems of Municipal Management 

Study of selected problems of city management, with emphasis on "house- 
keeping" and line operations. 

PA635 Statistics for Public Administrators 

Provides a basic theoretical treatment of the nature of statistical analysis 
and its role in economic research design and procedure. 

PA640 Purchasing 

Current innovative techniques used in purchasing. Emphasis on ware- 
housing, storage, inventory control, and cooperative purchasing plans. 

PA647 Zoning and Land Subdivision Regulation 

Ordinance structure and planning theory as expressed in texts of or- 
dinances. Selected court cases. 

PA650 Administrative Law 

A searching for principles and criteria against which public interest can 
be balanced with private right in the changing patterns of government, with 
particular reference to the American System. 

PA651 Municipal Corporation 

Nature of the municipal corporation embracing creation and dissolution 
legislative power over such corporations, extent of municipal powers, police 
power, zoning, power to contract, rights and remedies of creditors, power 
to issue evidence of indebtedness. 

PA660 Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 

Explores the concept of physical planning within the urban develop- 
ment framework. The function of planning in its relationship to the environ- 
ment. Comprehensive planning with its many ramifications involving the 
various sections of our society. Methods for analyzing problems as well 
as design methods for problem solving. 

PA661 Problems of Metropolitan Areas 

Analysis of the problems of government and administration arising from 
the population patterns and physical and social structures of contemporary 
metropolitan communities. 

PA662 Environmental Design 

A non-technical introduction to the physical sciences of ecology and the 
principle areas of pollution. Industry problems of pollution control and ef- 
fect of recent legislation will be explored to show how decisions of society 
affect our environment. 

97 



PA665 Systems Analysis in the Municipal Sector 

Introduction to the philosophy and techniques of systems analysis and 
its application to local government. Topics covered include systems defini- 
tions, effectiveness and worth measures, systems simulation concepts, and 
systems redesign for optimal performance. 

PA671 Administrative Problems 

Exploration of the practical experiences, and problem solving situations 
in the day-to-day activities of a Municipal Administrator. 

PA680 Seminar in Public Administration 

Exact material to be covered will be announced. 

PA690 Research Project I 

Independent study for advanced graduate students on selected problems 
in public administration. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor 

PA691 Research Project II 

Independent study for advanced graduate students on selected problems 
in public administration. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

PA692 Seminar in Public Opinion 

Problems of identification and analysis of public opinion and its impact 
upon the political process. Problems of data collection and questionnaire 
construction; categorization of qualitative data, elements of scaling, logic 
of multivariate analysis; role of comparative and cross-national surveys of 
public opinion. 

PA693 Public Administration Internship 

A supervised work experience in a cooperating public service agency 
related to government. Students must be available for at least 1 day per 
week. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor. 

PA695 Readings in Public Administration 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor 



Department of Physics 

PH680 Special Topics— Physics 

A study of selected topics of particular interest to students and instructor. 
Course may be taken more than once. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

98 



Department of Political Science 

PS601 Constitutional Law 

A study of the relation of the judicial process and constitutional law to 
the political process in the United States. Judicial review, federalism, and 
separation and delegation of powers. 

PS602 Civil Liberties and Rights 

An analysis of civil liberties, civil rights, due process, and equal protec- 
tion of the law. An examination of the role of the public official in the 
protection, denial, or abridgement of the constitutional and legal rights 
of individuals. 

PS603 International Law 

A study of the role of international law in the modern state system with 
particular reference to individuals; territorial jurisdiction; law of the sea, 
air, and space; and the development of law through international organiza- 
tions. 

PS605 Criminal Law 

Scope, purpose, definition, and classification of criminal law. Offenses 
against the person habitation, and occupancy. Offenses against property 
and other offenses. Special defenses. Emphasis on the Connecticut penal 
code. 

PS608 The Legislative Process 

An analysis of The Legislative Process in the American political system. 
Stress will be placed on legislative politics in state and local government. 
Among areas covered will be legislative functions, selection and recruitment 
of legislative candidates, legislative role orientations, the legislative sociali- 
zation process, the committee system, the legislators and their constituencies, 
legislative lobbyists, legislative decision-making, legislative-executive rela- 
tions and legislative organization and procedures. 

PS616 Urban Government and Politics 

An examination of the urban political system. Stress will be placed on the 
political aspects of urban government structures. Among the areas covered 
will be formal and informal decision-making in urban government, com- 
munity power structures, types of urban government structures, the politics 
of inter-government relations and the politics of servicing the urban environ- 
ment ( social services, planning agencies, education, housing, transportation, 
health, pollution control and ecology, revenue sharing, public safety, neigh- 
borhood corporations, etc. ) 

PS626 Decision-Making in The Political Process 

An in-depth study of decision-making in the American system with spe- 
cial emphasis upon the various types of mechanisms, i.e., executive, legis- 
lative, judicial, bureaucratic, organizational and military. The influence of 
intelligence, economic and psychological factors, and social pressures upon 
decisions and decision-makers will be examined. 

99 



PS628 Change and Government 

A study of the major processes of change and their consequences for the 
functioning of government. The course will concentrate upon changes that 
may occur through violence, evolution, or technology, and which may alter 
the effective operation of government. 



Department of Management Science 

QA600 Quantative Analysis No Credit 

Basic mathematics for solving economic and business problems. Topics 
include algebra review, equations and inequalities, graphs, exponential and 
logarithmic functions, an introduction to differential and integral calculus, 
and matrix algebra. 

QA604 Probability and Statistics 

An introduction to business statistics. Topics include data analysis and 
presentation, frequency distributions, probability theory, probability dis- 
tributions, decision making under uncertainty, sampling and statistical in- 
ference, hypothesis testing, t, X, and F tests. 

Prerequisites: QA 600 or 9 hours of quantita- 
tive courses 

QA605 Advanced Statistics 

A continuation of QA 604. Topics include simple regression and correla- 
tion, multiple regression, analysis of variance, index numbers, time series 
analysis, seasonal and cyclical variations, and an introduction of forecast- 
ing techniques. 

Prerequisites: Q A 604 or IE 607 

QA606 Advanced Management Science 

An examination, from a management viewpoint, of the scope of ap- 
plicability of the methods and models developed in IE 601 Management 
Science and QA 604-5 Statistics. Topics include parametric programming 
and economic interpretation of the dual LP problem, marginal costs and 
revenues, shadow prices, opportunity costs, incremental costs, costs of 
deviation from optimal solution point(s), and location or construction of 
desirable alternate optimal solutions. 

Prerequisites: IE 601 and QA 604-5 

QA607 Forecasting 

A survey of some basic techniques and methods used in forecasting at 
the level of the firm and industry. Topics covered are naive forecasting 
methods, index numbers, types of economic fluctuations, criteria for fitting 
estimating lines, Gompertz curve, arithmetic straight line, parabolic trend, 
logarithmic straight line, seasonal variation, economic indicators, simple 
correlation and regression, multiple correlation and regression, curvilinear 
and time series regression. 

Prerequisites: QA 605 or permission of the in- 
structor 

100 



QA690 Research Project 

Independent study under the supervision of an advisor. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission 
of the instructor 

QA698 Thesis 

Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 



Department of Science and Biology 

SC601 Ecology for Environmental Engineers 

An introduction to the biological aspects of environmental problems. In- 
cludes discussion of the concepts of bioecology, organisms (micro-organ- 
isms, plants, animals) important in pollution control and detection, and 
human organ systems most affected by pollution. 

SC602 Pollutants and the Aquatic Environment 

Discusses the interrelationships between the various kinds of pollutants, 
the morphology of the lake, river, or coastal area, and the effects on the 
individual organism and the ecosystem as a whole. Treatment methods 
using organisms are also discussed. 

Prerequisite: SC 601 

SC603 Air Pollution 

An introduction to air movements in the atmosphere and their relation to 
pollutants; and the effect of air pollution on organisms, with special em- 
phasis on the effects on human beings. 

Prerequisite: SC 601 

SC607 Characterization and Treatment of Wastes w/Lab 

Procedures for identifying and treating potential pollutants produced 
by domestic sewage, industrial wastes, agriculture, mining, transportation, 
etc. are discussed. 

SC608 Water Quality 

Recognition of the organisms and substances of polluted waters; the 
selection of the appropriate methods of collection, testing, and analyzing 
the data. The functions and interrelations of governmental agencies in con- 
trolling water pollution. 

Prerequisites: SC 602 & CH 601 

SC610 General Environmental Health 

Principles of public health with general emphasis given to environmental 
factors such as air and water pollutants, legal standards, and preventative 
measures with the relationship of these to public health. 

101 



SC612 Freshwater and Marine Biology 

Investigation of relationships between aquatic systems and the organisms 
living in these systems. Emphasis placed on the manner by which ecological 
studies of aquatic systems are conducted. 

SC621 Microbiology w Lob 

An in depth survey of the groups of microorganisms ranging from the 
fungi to the viruses. Classification, growth, reproduction, metabolism and 
major impact on man will be stressed. Current literature and lab techniques 
pertinent to each group will be utilized. 

SC622 Bacteriology w Lab 

Study of the characteristics basic to classification of bacteria. Group by 
group study of bacteria with emphasis on the major detrimental and bene- 
ficial contributions of each group as these affect man and his environment. 
Students will be expected to survey recent findings in scientific publications. 

SC690 Research Project 

Independent study under the supervision of an advisor. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Department of Sociology 

SO601 Minority Group Relations 

An interdisciplinary survey of minority groups in the United States with 
special reference to ethnic, religious, and racial factors that influence in- 
teraction. 

SO605 Culture and Personality 

The effect of different cultures upon personality development. Cultural 
mores and norms as vehicles of control. 

50607 Delinquency and Juvenile Crime 

A general introduction to the field of delinquency and crime, including 
all aspects of the social and personal matrix out of which these forms of 
social destructiveness arise. 

50608 Criminology 

A survey of the available data and theories relating to the scope and 
nature of the crime problem, characteristics of the offenders, and the fac- 
tors that are correlated with crime. Emphasis on social institutions that play 
significant roles in the increase or decrease of criminal activity as it exists 
in the United States and other cultures. Environmental and personality 
factors that influence criminal behavior. 

50609 Comparative Social Organization 

A comparative analysis of social and political organizations in cultures 
of varying complexity. 

102 



SO610 Urban Sociology 

The problem of urban growth and development. Residential patterns to- 
gether with the physical development of cities and the redevelopment 
plans. An examination of the people and their relationships to the en- 
vironment. 

Prerequisite: PA 604 

SO620 Sociology of Bureaucracy 

A study of some of the classic conceptualizations of Bureaucracy and their 
relevance for the structure and functioning of American economic and gov- 
ernmental institutions. The course will be designed to give students infor- 
mational and experiental resources with which they, as planners and man- 
agers, can improve their abilities to make effective policy decisions. 

S0631 Population Problems and Human Ecology 

A sociological approach to social demography with attention on popula- 
tion growth, patterns of distribution of population, and the population 
changes and trends. 

S0635 Sociology of Law 

A study of the social origins and consequences of law and legal processes. 
Emphasis on problems of legal change and the structure and functioning 
of legal sanctions. Emphasis on law and legal sanction in other societies, 
including primitive societies. Major focus on American society. 

S0641 Death and Suicide 

In-depth analysis of suicide. Traditional theories of suicide are analyzed 
regarding the psychological approach as well as the demographic and group 
analysis of sociology. The goal of the course is both academic and com- 
munity application. 



103 



FACULTY- 1976-1977 

Arnold, Joseph J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 
M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Bechir, M. Hamdy, Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 
Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Bradshaw, Alfred, Associate Professor, Sociology 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Brown, David, Professor, Psychology 

M.A., Columbia University; Licensed Consulting Psychologist 

Carson, George R., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

M.S.C.E., Columbia University, Professional Engineer, Landscape Arch- 
itect 

Chandra, Satish, Associate Professor, International Business 
J.S.D., Yale University 

Chepaitis, Joseph, Associate Professor, History 
Ph.D., Georgetown University 

Clifford, Frank M., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Coleman, John R., Assistant Professor, Management Science 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Courtney, Dennis M., Associate Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Dinegar, Caroline, Professor, Political Science 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Eikaas, Faith H., Professor, Sociology 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Ferringer, Natalie, Assistant Professor, Political Science 
M.A., University of Virginia 

Flaumenhaft, Frank, Assistant Professor, Management Science 
M.B.A., New York University 

George, Edward T., Professor, Industrial Engineering 
D.Engr., Yale University 

Gere, William S., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 
Greet, Richard J., Associate Professor, Materials Engineering 

Ph.D., Harvard University 
Grodzinsky, Stephen, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Haberman, Ronald A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 

M.S.O.R., Florida Institute of Technology 

101 



Harricharan, Wilfred, Professor, Management Science 
Ph.D., Cornell University 

Hoffnung, Robert J., Associate Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Horning, Darrell W., Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Hyman, Arnold, Associate Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Jensen, Gwendolyn E., Associate Professor, History 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Jewell, Walter O. Ill, Associate Professor, Sociology 
Ph.D., Harvard Graduate School 

Kakalik, John S., Associate Professor, Marketing & International Business 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Kalma, Dennis L., Assistant Professor, Science & Biology 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Kaplan, Phillip, Professor, Economics 

Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

Karatzas, George, Associate Professor, Economics 
Ph.D., New York University 

Katsaros, Thomas, Professor, History 
Ph.D., New York University 

Kayiira, Andrew L., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
M.A., State University of New York at Albany 

Kirwin, Gerald J., Professor, Electrical Engineering 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Kleinfeld, Ira H., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
Eng. Sc. D., Columbia University 

Kravet, Robert W., Assistant Professor, Accounting 
M.S., University of Massachusetts, C.P.A. 

Lambrakis, Constantine C, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
Ph.D., Rensselear Polytechnic Institute 

Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

M.S.C.E., University of Connecticut, Professional Engineer 

Lee, Henry C, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., New York University 

Maillard, Charles A., Jr., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
J.D., St. Louis University 

Mandour, Ahmed R., Associate Professor, Economics 
Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

Mann, Richard A., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

105 



Martin, John C, Professor, Civil Engineering 

M.E., Yale University; Professional Engineer 

McCrohan, Kevin F., Assistant Professor, Marketing & International Business 
M.B.A., Baruch College, City University of New York 

McGee, Frank, Assistant Professor, Public Administration 
M.P.A., Syracuse University 

Meier, Robert D., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Mentzer, Thomas L., Associate Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., Brown University 

Millen, Roger N., Associate Professor, Management Science 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

Montague, Richard, Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
M.S., Columbia University 

Murillo, Robert B., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
M.A., University of New Mexico 

Nordlund, Kai K., Associate Professor, Law 
D.J.S, New York Law School 

O'Keefe, Daniel C, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 
Ph.D., Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

Paelet, David, Associate Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Parker, Joseph A., Professor, Economics 
Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

Parker, L. Craig, Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo 

Pearson, Edwin, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
L.L.M., Harvard Law School 

Petersen, Willard S., Assistant Professor, Economics 
M.B.A., Dartmouth College 

Plotnick, Alan, Professor, Economics 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Reimer, Richard, Associate Professor, Accounting 
M.S., Columbia University; C.P.A. 

Rich, Anne, Assistant Professor, Accounting 
M.B.A., University of Bridgeport; C.P.A. 

Robin, Gerald P., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Rodgers, Belinda, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
A.B.D., State University of New York at Albany 

Saleeby, Buddy B., Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
Ph.D., Northwestern University 

106 



Sandman, Joshua H., Assistant Professor, Political Science 
M.A., New York University 

Sawhney, Shiv L., Associate Professor, Management Science 
Ph.D., New York University 

Sherwood, Franklin B., Professor, Economics 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Silbert, Louis, Assistant Professor, Management Science 
M.B.A., University of Hartford 

Smith, Warren J., Associate Professor, Management Science 
M.B.A., Northeastern University 

Sommers, Alexis N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

Stanley, Bichard M., Associate Professor, Mathematics 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Surti, Kantilal K., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Teluk, John J., Associate Professor, Economics 
M.A., Free University, Munich 

Theilman, Ward, Associate Professor, Economics 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Vasileff, Henry D., Associate Professor, Finance 
Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Voegeli, Henry E., Assistant Professor, Science & Biology 
Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 

Wentworth, Ronald N., Assistant Professor, Management Science 
M.S. I.E., University of Massachusetts 

Whiteman, Gilbert, Associate Professor, Communications 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Williams, Jeffrey L., Associate Professor, Accounting 
M.B.A., University of Bridgeport; C.P.A. 

Wilson, Ned B., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Yanover, Ruth W., Associate Professor, Marketing 
M.A., University of Wisconsin 

York, Michael W., Associate Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Zern, Martin, Assistant Professor, Accounting 
L.L.M., New York University; C.P.A. 

Zingale, Paul, Assistant Professor, Management Science 
M.A., University of Minnesota 

107 



LECTURERS 

Beck, Irving S., Lecturer, Public Administration 
M.S., University of Denver 

Bragaw, Louis K., Lecturer, Economics 

D.B.A., George Washington University 

Burnaska, Robert F., Lecturer, Psychology 
Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Butterworth, William J., Lecturer, Accounting 
M.B.A., Seton Hall University; C.P.A. 

Connery, J. Matthew, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

DeMayo, William, Lecturer, Taxation 
M.B.A., New York University 

Gavaghan, Thomas F., Lecturer, Psychology 
M.B.A., University of Hartford 

Gerdine, Philip V., Lecturer, Accounting 
Ph.D., Boston University; C.P.A. 

Gerner, William L., Lecturer, Taxation 
J.D., St. John's University; C.P.A. 

Gill, Charles D., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 
J.D., Catholic University of America 

Goldstein, Donald A., Lecturer, Psychology 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Grodzinsky, Frances, Lecturer, English 
M.A., University of Illinois 

Gulati, Bodh R., Lecturer, Management Science 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Harmen, Stanley A., Lecturer, International Business 
Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

Hickey, Joseph E., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 
Ed.D., Boston University 

Hollmann, Thomas D., Lecturer, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Pae, Ki-Tai, Lecturer, Economics 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Patel, Jayant, Lecturer, Mathematics 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Potochney, Andrew J., Lecturer, Accounting 
M.B.A., University of Bridgeport; C.P.A. 

Poulson, Christian F., Lecturer, Management Science 
M.B.A., University of New Haven 

108 



Puleo, Joseph A., Lecturer, Accounting 

M.B.A., Baruch College, City University of New York; C.P.A. 

Reid, Thomas A., Lecturer, Psychology 
D.Psy., University of Illinois 

Rezendes, Dennis, Lecturer, Public Administration 
M.G.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Ryack, Bernard, Lecturer, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Scalia, Frank A., Lecturer, Psychology 
Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Silbert, Jonathan E., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 
J.D., Harvard Law School 

Steinberg, Marvin A., Lecturer, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 

Swift, Henry R., Lecturer, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Vermont 

Usher, Theron, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
D.E., Yale University 

Weybrew, Benjamin B., Lecturer, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Colorado 

Woods, Jimmie D., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Zottola, Armand, Lecturer, Economics 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



8/76 7500 



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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Main Building 

Staff, Faculty and Visitor Parking 

Student Services and Admissions Building 

Engineering-Science Building 

Student Center and Cafeteria 

Book Store 

Administration Building (Gate Mouse) 

Residence 

Graduate School 

10. Marvin K. Peterson Library 

11. Physical Education-Auditorium Building 




CAMPBELL AVTNUF CONN. ROUTT 122 



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WATERBURY 



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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 

WEST HAVEN, CONN. 



| mi a 



FROM 

4 MERIOEN 




BRIDGEPORT 



FROM 

NEW YORK CITY 



LEGEND 

Hi Heavy lines mark best routes to the campus 



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